Senior creative writing major Ian Roesler poses for a photo April 7, 2021, in the photojournalism studio. According to data from a 2019 YouGov poll, 12 percent of Americans like pineapple as a pizza topping. Jaden Whiteman, DN Illustration

The Gaggle: Pineapple-beration

 Pineapples are good. Pizza is good. Combined, however, they are not. It’s a culinary aberration, the likes of which has been normalized in Western society and ingrained itself into the hearts and young minds of impressionable individuals.  



OPINION

Bold Type: Not just a fairytale

 Never in my life have I doubted the existence of true love or soul mates — people who were put on this earth to be our perfect match — because I have grown up with two parents whose hearts beat perfectly in sync, and, for me, witnessing 21 years of the love they share is enough proof that true love does exist. 


Kamryn Tomlinson, Taylor Smith, DN
OPINION

Abstraction: It's all about sex and love

Women are consistently looked at when it comes to sex and love. If we say something about love, it is analyzed under a microscope. If we don’t, we are asked what’s on the horizon for our love life and why we don’t have a romantic partner. If we show our bodies or dress provocatively, we are shunned. For a woman, it’ll always be about sex and love, and I’m sick of it.



Sophomore journalism major, Emily Hunter holds several of her favorite comic books, March 23, 2021, in the photojournalism studio. Rylan Capper DN
OPINION

Speak Out: Un-Comical Culture

Fans of these stereotypically “nerdy” movies, shows, books and games have been through their fair share of discrimination and bullying, no matter their gender. Many of them turn to these worlds as a safe space where they are free to be themselves. If these women are bullied in the “mainstream” world then shunned from the world they escape to, where are they left to turn? Women in these communities aren’t going anywhere, and it’s time we are represented and treated with respect. 


Maggie Getzin, DN
OPINION

Bold Type: I Will Speak Up

I am a woman in the workplace. I am one woman on a college campus of 22,000 students — an intellectual trying to save money for her college education by waitressing at one of the only restaurants and bars open during a pandemic — and I am tired of feeling like a trophy rather than a colleague, entertainment rather than an employee.



Maggie Getzin, DN
OPINION

Bold Type: Eating disorders don’t discriminate

The logic that one can only have an eating disorder if they look a certain way, are a certain gender or weigh a certain number is stereotypical and discourages those who do not fit the societal criteria from seeking help for serious disordered eating.


Kennedi Barnett, DN
OPINION

Letter to the Editor: Black Ball

The story of Black students at Ball State is one of perseverance — it is a story of the Black students’ tenacity and faith in themselves, each other and the university.


Redshirt freshman Mitchell Carter puts on his helmet Nov. 25, 2019. Jacob Musselman, DN Illustration
OPINION

Let your kids be kids

So, you’ve signed up little Robert for tee ball, and before long, you realize your child is good. Not just good — this kid is going to be the next Derek Jeter. So, naturally, you take the next step and install a full baseball infield in your basement, spend every weekend at the batting cages and travel all over the country competing in prestigious Little League tournaments. After all, you want to give your little champion the best chance at getting that college scholarship and set them up for a beautiful, storied career in the MLB, right?



OPINION

In Between the Lines: Right to life

I was raised with the belief that once you are brought into this world, you have a purpose and are deserving of life. The morals that have been instilled in me since birth tell me laws like the death penalty should cease to exist, but morality can’t necessarily be backed up by fact.


OPINION

Abstraction: The double standard

A click of the remote brought the booming voices of reporters from the television right to my living room. Slowly, members of my family made their way to the television too — a flash of stone cold reality we were usually able to escape from in our isolated Indiana home. Wide-eyed and almost mesmerized by what was happening, we stood in awe as Americans congregated and broke into the United States Capitol building with weapons, waved flags, intimidated police officers, sat in representatives’ seats and treated the sacred building as if it were their territory to destroy.


Maggie Getzin, DN Illustration
OPINION

Speak Out: We Need A Break

Before I stepped onto campus as a sophomore this fall, I knew it was going to be nothing like my freshman year. Classes were online, fall break was canceled and students moved home for the semester right before Thanksgiving. At the time, I couldn’t tell if the lack of rest fall break and Labor Day provided would even make a difference in the semester. 


While the main ingredients of Raisin Bran are wheat and raisins, there is around 19 grams of sugar, according to the nutrition facts label. Omari Smith, DN Illustration
OPINION

Full Dis-Chlo-sure: #BanTheBran

When I tell you I’m speechless, when I tell you I feel betrayed, when I tell you it took less than a moment for the light to leave my eyes, I say that with my whole chest. I wanted to avoid controversy and keep the peace, but an anger which has long remained stagnant within me has been reignited.  At the risk of rambling, I’ll just say it — Raisin Bran should be illegal.


OPINION

In Reflection: The final lap

The winter has always made me feel nostalgic. Waking up to cold air makes me feel like a 16-year-old boy, scrambling to get my jammers and goggles for swim practice, slamming back coffee and sprinting out the door. Now, with the end of the fall 2020 semester so close and that fabled finish line in sight, I’ll have more to remember waking up in the winter.


OPINION

Unspoken: Time's Arrow

My freshman year, this column was titled “Demi’s Diems.” I tried to play on the saying “Carpe Diem” or “Seize the day,” therefore making my column name “Demi’s Days.” It was an easy decision when I found out I could change my column title sophomore year — I mean, come on, “Demi’s Diems” was pretty terrible.  So, I chose the column name “Unspoken.”


Shwetha Sundarrajan writes down misspellings of her name Nov. 3, 2020, in the photojournalism studio. Throughout Sundarrajan’s life, her name has been misspelled and misspoken. Jacob Musselman, DN Illustration
OPINION

This is the Shwe: Say my name

If you’re someone who has a “unique” name, you probably know the mortal embarrassment of roll call on the first day of school. I grew up memorizing my place in the roll call list, and the moment the teacher would falter, I knew my time had come.






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