Greg Weaver and Jeff Crosby work in an Indiana Statehouse press shack in 1983 while covering the Indiana General Assembly. That same year, the Daily News won Newspaper of the Year at ICPA. Greg Weaver, Photo Provided
DN 100

There's No Place Like Home: Former Daily News adviser and editors reflect on 100 years

  The newsroom wasn’t always Doug Toney’s home. When he was a freshman at Ball State in 1969, Toney was on track to become a history teacher. Born and raised on the farm, he said it made sense to have summers off and help his family out on the property. But, after one mass communications class with George Harper, former professor of journalism, Toney was “hooked.”


ENTERPRISE

Habitat’s Heroine

With a bottle of water, reading materials and a phone charging on the table beside her, Sharon Kay Brown sits in her favorite rocking chair every Tuesday evening and tunes into NBC’s “Chicago Fire.”


Raegan Gorden plays the drum set March 19 during a rehearsal. Gorden plays in the bands "Whydah" and "Leisure Hour." Rylan Capper, DN
CAMPUS

Back in the Groove: Almost two years after the COVID-19 pandemic began, Ball State’s music scene is slowly rebuilding

Guitars strumming. Music blaring. Voices raised. People dancing.  Before March 2020, the music scene on Ball State’s campus was as lively as ever. Then, everything changed. Once the pandemic hit, shows were immediately canceled, and the noise that once filled Ball State’s campus became a nearly silent hum. Now, slowly but surely, the scene is rebuilding, the sound is returning and music is back once again.




Second Year Grad Sculpture Student Ellen Leigh (left) gives Sandy Tharp (right) a mount that she sculpted for Tharp to put the basket on top of on Jan. 14, 2022 at Forever Baskets in Muncie, IN. Amber Pietz, DN
COMMUNITIES

Members of Muncie craft shop Forever Baskets talk about basket weaving and the business

  It starts with the base, a circular slab of wood surrounded by thinner strands, which travel the perimeter of the slab, around and around. Tall strands the size of popsicle sticks reach toward the sky, away from the circular motion of the other strands, almost making a fence. Where the end of the continuous circle meets the sky-reaching fence, the thinner circular strands begin to weave around the taller strands, enveloping them. This is basket weaving.


Erica Robinson Moody laughs while doing her son Brooklyn's hair Jan. 27. Erica's mission statement for her classes is "bridging the cultural gaps in the beauty community," and she is very focused on cultural hair education. Maya Wilkins, DN
BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Muncie Education in Biracial Hair class aims to change the beauty industry

In a room attached to the kitchen of Erica Robinson Moody’s home sits two salon chairs. A cabinet is filled with different colored hair dyes, an apron hangs on a hook near a large mirror and products stand in single-file lines on the counters.  Her son, Brooklyn Moody, sits in a salon chair where his mom said he often falls asleep, while she takes a comb, twirls it tightly on a small section of his hair and creates a tight, springy curl an inch or two in length. Dozens of these curls lie across his head. Brooklyn’s hairstyle takes 45 minutes to style this way, and the style only stays for about a week —  a reality for biracial hair.







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