Eli Houser

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Rustic Rebels Geode and Crystal Mine opened in October 2021 in the former location of ScreenBroidery, which moved a few doors down on West University Avenue last year. Along with other business updates in the Village this school year, there is construction at the old Two Cats Cafe location. Eli Houser, DN
NEWS

New and established Village businesses share the inspiration behind opening their doors

The Village wasn’t always as lively as it is now. After the 2008 recession, many buildings sat vacant while landlords tried to find buyers. While some businesses, including Village Green Records and White Rabbit Used Books, survived 2008, the recession coinciding with the COVID-19 pandemic saw some businesses move out of the Village and others move in. Jack’s Donuts and Rustic Rebels Geode and Crystal Mine are two businesses that just opened last semester, with ScreenBroidery also moving its location.


Sam Miller, director of Undergraduate Studies for Innovation & Entrepreneurship at the University of Notre Dame, speaks during the “Creating a Sustainable Society,” webinar Oct. 26. Miller shared examples of companies around the U.S. and explained their sustainable business practices. Eli Houser, Screenshot Capture
NEWS

'Creating a Sustainable Society' webinar provides in-depth look at sustainability across US

The Ball State College of Health and the American Dairy Association, Indiana Inc. sponsored “Creating a Sustainable Society,” a webinar series on modern sustainability practices, Oct. 26. With speakers from multiple areas of expertise including architecture, agriculture and business, the series aims to explain the problems and solutions being implemented across the world to combat climate change and unsustainable industry practices.


Jaylyn Graham poses for a photo next to his artwork "The Colorism Series," Sept. 13 in the Multicultural Center. The piece was part of Graham's senior exhibition "The Black Experience." Rylan Capper, DN
NEWS

Multicultural Center staff shares goals for new location

Formed in the 1970s, Ball State’s Multicultural Center has served as a resource for students of color and other minority groups for nearly 50 years. Now located in the heart of campus near Bracken Library, the center hopes to educate and inform students on current issues relating to race, culture and inclusivity.

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