The Supreme Court said Monday it will consider a case that could lead to a significant rollback of the Roe v. Wade decision. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images/TNS)

Five national stories of the week

President Biden moves to improve legal services for the poor and minorities, an associate of Rep. Matt Gaetz pleads guilty to sex trafficking charges, the Supreme Court will take up a major abortion rights challenge, the officer charged in the Daunte Wright death will stand trial Dec. 6 and California faces another month until unmasking begins make up this week's five national stories. 



A thick column of smoke rises from the Jala Tower as it is destroyed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City controlled by the Palestinian Hamas movement, on May 15, 2021. The ongoing Israeli attacks on the Gaza Strip have left dozens of people dead and more than 1,000 others injured. (Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto/Zuma Press/TNS)
NEWS

Five international stories of the week

Israeli military strikes continue in the war between Palestinian militant groups and Israel, India begins to recover from its rise in COVID-19 cases, Saudi Arabia lifts its travel ban for vaccinated citizens, the United Kingdom works to lift all COVID-19 restrictions next month and China landed a spacecraft on Mars make up this week's five international stories.



NEWS

Ball State spring 2021 graduates celebrate in-person commencement

Ball State had never hosted a commencement ceremony at Scheumann Stadium before May 7, but administrators chose the venue because of its ability to host people while still following COVID-19 health guidelines. Seats on Scheumann’s turf were socially distanced and sanitized between ceremonies. Graduates were limited to four guest tickets each. Guests were also socially distanced on the bleachers.



Ball State President Geoffrey Mearns prepares for the Board of Trustees meeting May 7, 2021, in the Student Center. Mearns announced the fall 2021 and spring 2022 semesters would include traditional fall and spring breaks. John Lynch, DN
NEWS

Ball State returning to traditional academic calendar for fall 2021

At the May 7 in-person meeting, the Ball State Board of Trustees approved a resolution regarding COVID-19 protocols on campus. Ball State President Geoffrey Mearns led the presentation, where he said most of campus life will be returning to normal in the fall, including scheduled fall and Thanksgiving breaks. The spring 2022 semester will also include a spring break March 6-13.


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Ball State hosts 2021 bed races

An annual Homecoming event at Ball State broke away from tradition Friday afternoon. The Bed Races, which have traditionally been held on Riverside Avenue, were instead held at the University Track at Briner Sports Complex to minimize the spread of COVID-19.



The Whitinger Business Building houses the Miller College of Business. The College of Business hosts Dialogue Days with alumni to discuss how they received jobs and to offer networking opportunities. Jenna Gorsage, DN File
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Ball State faculty, national statistics predict job market growth in COVID-19 recovery

More than 3 million students are expected to earn degrees from colleges and universities this spring, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Those students will enter the job market as the nation continues to recover from the COVID-induced recession, which the National Bureau of Economic Research states began in February 2020. However, new and recent college graduates may be in a better position than other candidates seeking new careers.


Members of the Ball State Code Red Dance Team perform their routine to an almost-empty Emens Auditorium April 14, 2021. The recording of Air Jam was closed to the public, only allowing media members and participants. Jacob Musselman, DN
NEWS

Ball State annual Air Jam competition continues with pandemic adjustments

At first, there is silence. Several performers stand like statues on the stage, waiting for the first beat of music to signal the start of their dance. As their breath quickens from nerves, they might be tempted to look out into the crowd, where their friends would normally be cheering them on. However, this year is different — there is no cheering crowd. 








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