5 national stories of the week

<p>Protesters gather at a memorial for George Floyd where he died outside Cup Foods on East 38th Street and Chicago Avenue, June 1, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25. <strong>(AP Photo/John Minchillo)</strong></p>

Protesters gather at a memorial for George Floyd where he died outside Cup Foods on East 38th Street and Chicago Avenue, June 1, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from across the United States. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Seventh straight night of unrest following the death of George Floyd, the president's photo op at St. John's Church, primary election voting in nine states and Washington, D.C., the music industry's call for Black Out Tuesday and the ownership of Joe Exotic's zoo being given to Carole Baskin make up this week’s five national stories.


Protesters march to the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge as they demonstrate against police brutality June 1, 2020, in Dallas. Protests continue over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25. (Ryan Michalesko/The Dallas Morning News via AP)

US cities erupt in more violence amid threats from Trump

American cities erupted in violence and destruction in a seventh straight night of unrest, with several police officers shot or run over, amid boasts and threats from President Donald Trump to send in troops to “dominate the streets.” More than 5,600 people nationwide have been arrested over the past week for offenses like stealing, blocking highways and breaking curfew, according to a count by The Associated Press. The death toll from the unrest rose to at least nine.

Read More: America protests


President Donald Trump walks from the White House through Lafayette Park to visit St. John's Church, June 1, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Tear gas, threats or protesters before Trump visits church

Law enforcement officers aggressively forced the legally gathered protesters back, firing tear gas and deploying flash bangs into the crowd to disperse them from Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C., all of it on live television. Following President Donald Trump’s address at the White House’s Rose Garden, he walked over to the historic St. John’s Church where he stood alone in front of the cameras and raised a black-covered Bible for reporters to see.

Read more: Donald Trump


Marty Goetz, right, and Diane White, prepare the voting screens as they start to set up a polling place June 1, 2020, for the voting for Tuesday's Pennsylvania primary in Jackson Township near Zelienople, Pa. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

9 states, DC vote amid coronavirus pandemic, social unrest

Voters are being asked to navigate curfews, health concerns and a sharp increase in mail balloting Tuesday as elections take place from Maryland to Montana. Four states were originally scheduled to vote in April but delayed their contests because of the coronavirus outbreak. Joe Biden needs to win 89 percent of all delegates at stake today to formally clinch the nomination, but his role as his party’s clear presidential nominee is not in danger should he fall short.

Read More: Election 2020


People take part in a Black Lives Matter protest June 1, 2020, in Amsterdam, Netherlands, to protest against the recent killing of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis after being restrained by police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Music industry calls for Black Out Tuesday amid unrest

The music industry is planning to turn off the music and hold a day to reflect and implement change in response to the death of George Floyd and the killings of other black people. Several top record labels organized Black Out Tuesday as violent protests erupted around the world sparked by Floyd’s death and the killings of Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor. MTV and BET went dark for eight minutes and 46 seconds in support of Black Lives Matter and racial injustice.

Read more: Music industry


Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue, walks the property July 20, 2017, near Tampa, Fla. A federal judge in Oklahoma has awarded ownership of the zoo made famous in Netflix's “Tiger King” docuseries to Joe Exotic's rival, Carole Baskin. (Loren Elliott/Tampa Bay Times via AP, File)

Judge gives control of Joe Exotic’s zoo to Carole Baskin

A federal judge in Oklahoma has awarded ownership of the zoo made famous in Netflix’s “Tiger King” docuseries to Joe Exotic’s chief rival. In a ruling Monday, U.S. District Judge Scott Palk granted control of the Oklahoma zoo that was previously run by Joseph Maldonado-Passage — also known as Joe Exotic — to Big Cat Rescue Corp. Maldonado-Passage is currently serving a 22-year federal prison term for killing five tigers and plotting to have Baskin killed.

Read More: Entertainment

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