Long lines formed during the early morning hours on Election Day at the 25th and 26th precincts at the First Presbyterian Church as people were trying to cast their vote before heading to work.

“There were people here waiting before 6 o’clock,” said Larry Rees, an inspector at the precincts. “During primaries we would have a few and we were able to read or do crossword puzzles, but not today.”

Larissa McFarland, a junior deaf education major, waited less than 20 minutes to vote at 6 a.m. on the west side of Indianapolis.

Delaware County had just over 10,000 early voting ballots.

"I voted in the primaries, but this was my first time voting for president," McFarland said.

Shortly after 6:30 a.m., the lines had shortened at the church and there was no longer a line to sign in or cast your ballot.

Election workers expected the lines to become longer around lunch hours, but were surprised when that was not the case.

Dakota Krug, a freshman criminal justice major, said he had to wait less than two minutes to vote at 1 p.m. at the 8th and 10th precincts at the Anthony Administration Building.

“Everything went very smoothly and the workers were very helpful,” Krug said.

Campaigners and poll workers who were sitting outside of the building said the lines really calmed down around 12:30 p.m.

Ruth Ann Berkey, who was campaigning outside of the 25th and 26th precincts at the First Presbyterian Church this morning, said she did not understand why people waited in line for hours to vote early.

“I would not go stand in line for hours because I knew I would be able to get right in at my poll,” Berkey said.

At 3 p.m., voters did not have to wait to cast their ballots at the church.

County Clerk Mike King told The Star Press that Delaware County had just over 10,000 early voting ballots. While this is down from the number of early ballots in the 2008 election, with so many people choosing to vote early, it is no surprise the lines were not very long today.