John Lynch


Articles

Malorie McLain, Ball State psychology graduate student, sits at a desk in the Health Professions Building Nov. 29. McLain hopes to use her training in rehabilitation counseling to help people with chronic illnesses and disabilities after she completes Ball State's PhD program. John Lynch, DN
NEWS

Ball State graduate students reflect on end of Ball State journeys

The end of the semester is synonymous with graduation, specifically the advancement of undergraduates into the workforce. However, for graduate school students, it means the culmination of an additional two years of schooling, taking their education to the next level. While graduate school can take many different paths, the result is often the same: A master’s degree.


Alex Hindenlang, DN Illustration, John Lynch, DN Photo
OPINION

Wounds at home

Rittenhouse was always going to get away with murder, not because of the facts of the situation, but because of the country we live in, a system that prioritizes white innocence over the suffering of others.


Maggie Getzin, DN Illustration
OPINION

Rise of the Billionaire Astronaut

Billionaires like Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson, who have all invested heavily in space exploration and transportation, aren’t in it for the final frontier — they’re in it for more money. 


NEWS

Sister Cindy's controversial sermon at Ball State drew hundreds of viewers to the Quad

TikTok star and viral sensation “Sister Cindy” Smock visited Ball State Friday afternoon to spread her message to the student body. With a Bible in one hand, a sign reading “Slut Shaming Time” in the other and wearing a shirt emblazoned with the message “Be a ho no mo,” Smock spent almost four hours on campus preaching her signature brand of evangelical Christianity. 


NEWS

Multicultural Center launches new book club

Ball State has a new club, courtesy of the Multicultural Center. The Multicultural Center Book Club held its first meeting Wednesday, Sept. 8 in the center’s multipurpose room. While attendance was low, attendees and organizers were excited for the group’s potential.


Illustration, Kamryn Tomlinson, DN
OPINION

Fine Print: What was it all for?

Unlike our millennial predecessors, very few people my age can remember what 9/11 was like, much less describe the way it made us feel. We were, however, left to grapple with its effects from the moment we were able to form memories.

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