Five international stories of the week

Two men accused of being involved in the assassination of Haiti President Jovenel Moise are transported to the Petion-Ville station in a police car in Port-au-Prince on July 8, 2021. (Valerie Baeriswyl/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
Two men accused of being involved in the assassination of Haiti President Jovenel Moise are transported to the Petion-Ville station in a police car in Port-au-Prince on July 8, 2021. (Valerie Baeriswyl/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

A Florida resident is detained as the latest suspect in the Haiti killing, two Jordanians are sentenced to 15 years over an alleged royal plot, France tries to slow the delta variant and boost vaccines, Italy erupts as Europe's soccer champions come home to Rome and China says it chased US warship out of disputed sea makes up this week's five international stories.

Florida resident detained as latest suspect in Haiti killing

The latest suspect detained amid the search for the masterminds and assassins in the killing of President Jovenel Moïse is a Haitian in his 60s living in Florida who identifies himself as a doctor and has accused the leaders of his homeland of corruption. Police identified the man on Sunday night as Christian Emmanuel Sanon and said Moïse’s alleged killers were protecting the suspect as the supposed president of Haiti. The head of Haiti’s police, Léon Charles, accused Sanon of working with those who plotted and participated in Moïse’s killing, which stunned the nation of more than 11 million people. He gave no information on the purported masterminds.

Two Jordanians sentenced to 15 years over alleged royal plot

A Jordanian state security court on Monday sentenced two former officials to serve 15 years in prison over an alleged plot against the Western-allied monarchy involving the half-brother of King Abdullah II. Bassem Awadallah, who has U.S. citizenship and once served as a top aide to King Abdullah II, and Sharif Hassan bin Zaid, a member of the royal family, were found guilty of sedition and incitement charges. They are alleged to have conspired with Prince Hamzah, the king’s half-brother, and to have sought foreign assistance. They denied the charges, and Alaa al-Khasawneh, a lawyer for Sharif, said they would appeal the verdict. He declined to comment further.

France's Macron tries to slow delta variant, boost vaccines

Just three days ago, France threw open its nightclubs for the first time in 16 months, completing a protracted national effort at returning to a pre-pandemic normal just in time for summer vacation. But with the delta variant now driving resurgent infections across Europe, potential new restrictions loom. President Emmanuel Macron is hosting a top-level virus security meeting Monday morning and then giving a televised speech in the evening. This time, he’s expected to announce plans for a law requiring health care workers to get vaccinated, and may require special COVID-19 passes for restaurants or other day-to-day activities. Either move would be unusual in Europe, where most governments have shied away from vaccine requirements.

Italy erupts as Europe's soccer champions come home to Rome

Europe’s soccer champions returned home at dawn on Monday to the ecstatic cheers of Italians who spent the better part of the night honking horns, setting off fireworks and violating all sorts of coronavirus precautions to celebrate their team’s 3-2 penalty shootout win over host England at Wembley Stadium. Captain Giorgio Chiellini, his fist pumping the air, and coach Roberto Mancini hoisted the trophy high over their heads as they descended from their Alitalia charter flight at Rome’s Leonardo da Vinci airport. Amid cheers from airport workers, defender Leonardo Spinazzola hopped down the steps on one foot, his other one in a cast after he injured his Achilles tendon earlier in the tournament.

China says it chased US warship out of disputed sea

China’s military said it chased a U.S. warship out of a disputed area of the South China Sea on Monday after Washington warned an attack on the Philippines might activate a mutual defense treaty. Beijing affirmed its claims to portions of the sea that also are claimed by Southeast Asia governments. It rejected the Biden administration’s declaration of support Sunday for an international tribunal ruling in favor of the Philippines that threw out most of them. China is increasingly assertive about pressing its territorial claims, which are fueling tension with neighbors including Japan, India, Vietnam and the Philippines. The People’s Liberation Army said it sent ships and planes after the U.S.S. Benfold entered waters claimed by Beijing around the Paracel Islands.

Comments

More from The Daily






This Week's Digital Issue