The anti-abortion organization Created Equal held a protest at the Scramble Light Tuesday. 

Evangeline Dunn, an intern at Created Equal, was the head spokesperson at the protest. Dunn said the organization displayed images of the results of aborting an unborn child to show what babies look like before they are born. 

“These totally grab people's attention,” Dunn said. “There’s other organizations that try to do stuff with just pretty baby pictures, and that’s great, but we need something that’s going to catch the public eye and get people to talk about it. It’s stirring up the conversation today, on this campus.”

The images did gather the attention of students like  Ben Hershey, a freshman psychology major.

“Well I had came over because I saw the signs, and I was actually really disgusted by the imagery.” Hershey said. “I didn’t appreciate it, and so I wanted to see maybe if I could talk to them about it, or learn more about it.” 

Hershey said that while he didn’t agree with everything the spokesperson said, he felt what was being said came from an honest place. 

“I appreciate their message, but I feel like their signs might really upset somebody that might be personally connected. I’d like them to change the signs,” Hershey said. 

Owen Miller, a junior philosophy and psychology dual major, felt a personal connection when he saw the signs.   

“A couple days ago, there was a little bit of a pregnancy scare with my girlfriend and I. We had to go get a pregnancy test, and fortunately she was negative,” Miller said. 

Miller said while he was already thinking about the position he and his girlfriend could have been in, he thought about how his girlfriend would have felt if they wanted to have an abortion and she had to walk by the protest. 

“It would probably be the worst experience she’s ever had, right? I just don’t think it’s fair for these people to just sort of thrust this experience onto various women on campus,” Miller said. 

While there was no danger to the protesters, precautions were still taken. All representatives wore body cameras during their time at the Scramble Light. 

“In the past, people from the opposing side can get violent or try to damage our property,” Dunn said. “Thankfully, by the Lord, we have not had any violence and we have not had to protect people.” Even though we disagree, we can still have civil conversation and [a bystander] can still listen to my point of view.” 

Contact Charles Melton with comments at cwmelton@bsu.edu