Feeling the rhythm for Governor Davis: Sight and Sound Music Center hosts tribute

<p>The Boothill band performs for audience members gathered to honor blues musician Governor Davis at the Sight and Sound Music Center in Muncie Nov. 1, 2021. Six bands were invited to perform in honor of Davis, who died in mid-October. <strong>Krystiana Brosher, DN</strong></p>

The Boothill band performs for audience members gathered to honor blues musician Governor Davis at the Sight and Sound Music Center in Muncie Nov. 1, 2021. Six bands were invited to perform in honor of Davis, who died in mid-October. Krystiana Brosher, DN

People of all ages came out to Ball State alumnus Governor Davis’ memorial Monday night at Sight and Sound Music Center.

The event was originally planned for Oct. 28, but was canceled because of the weather. Local Muncie bands and fans gathered in honor of Davis, a blues musician who died of COVID-19 in mid-October. Guests donated to Davis’ family upon entry. 

Jason Struble, president of the World Music Supply, wanted to do something special because he saw “Gov” as part of his family. He said Davis would come in and out of Sight & Sound frequently. Davis taught guitar at Sight & Sound for at least 22 years, though Struble said he didn't know the exact date Davis started teaching because he had been on staff since before computerized accounting.

“There is not a person Gov met that he didn’t make your life better,” Struble said. “The world is a much better place because of Governor Davis.”

There were six bands in the lineup, including the Boothill band, Remedy band, Blue 32 and more. The closing act was the Governor Davis Reunion Band. 

The Remedy band performs in honor of blues musician Governor Davis in front of the Sight and Sound Music Center in Muncie Nov. 1, 2021. Sight and Sound owner Jason Struble said Davis taught guitar lessons at Sight and Sound for 22 years. Krystiana Brosher, DN

While the night was chilly, the weather didn’t stop people from getting up and dancing to the music. 

In addition to the live music, there was a silent auction open to the public. All the proceeds will go to Davis’ family to help pay for burial and medical expenses, according to the GoFundMe page. Some of the items in the auction included hats, guitars — one of them signed by Davis, drumsticks, microphones and guitar cases. 

While Governor Davis can no longer perform, attendance at his memorial proves he will live on in the community.

“It’s amazing how many people showed up,” Struble said. “You never really know how much you’re appreciated until you're gone.”

Contact Krystiana Brosher with comments at krystiana.brosher@bsu.edu or on Twitter @Krystiana_21.

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