Five international stories of the week

In a photo taken from a television, Tunisian President Kais Saied announces the dissolution of parliament and Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi's government on Sunday, July 25, 2021 at Carthage Palace after a day of nationwide protest. (Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images/TNS)
In a photo taken from a television, Tunisian President Kais Saied announces the dissolution of parliament and Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi's government on Sunday, July 25, 2021 at Carthage Palace after a day of nationwide protest. (Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images/TNS)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Tunisia on edge as the president suspends parliament and fires the prime minister, two COVID patients dead after power outage at a Jordan hospital, 28 abducted Baptist school students freed in Nigeria, pandemic Olympics endured heat, and not a typhoon's en route and the Vatican trial opens into financial scandal rocking papacy makes up this week's five international stories.

Tunisia on edge as president suspends parliament, fires PM

Troops surrounded Tunisia’s parliament and blocked its speaker from entering Monday after the president suspended the legislature and fired the prime minister following nationwide protests over the country’s economic troubles and the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis. Protesters celebrated President Kais Saied’s decision late Sunday night with shouts of joy, honking of horns and waving Tunisian flags. But his critics accused him of a power grab, and the North African country’s overseas allies expressed concern that its young democracy might be descending again into autocracy. In a move sure to fuel those worries, police raided the offices of broadcaster Al Jazeera and ordered it to shut down.

2 COVID patients dead after power outage at Jordan hospital

Two coronavirus patients died at a hospital in the Jordanian capital of Amman on Sunday after a short circuit knocked out power at the facility’s intensive care unit, the country’s health minister said. The private Gardens Hospital is being rented by the Jordanian government to treat coronavirus patients. Health Minister Firas Al-Hawari told state media Sunday that two people were confirmed dead at the hospital after the incident, and that investigators were determining the cause of the accident and whether the power outage was responsible for the deaths. Angry people gathered outside the hospital and security forces cordoned off the facility and prevented relatives of patients from entering.

28 abducted Baptist school students freed in Nigeria

Armed kidnappers in Nigeria have released 28 of the more than 120 students who were abducted at the beginning of July from the Bethel Baptist High School in the northern town of Damishi. Church officials handed those children over to their parents at the school on Sunday. But the Rev. Israel Akanji, president of the Baptist Convention, said more than 80 other children are still being held by the gunmen. So far 34 children kidnapped from the school on July 5 have either been released or have escaped from the custody of the gunmen. It is unclear when the other children will be released. The gunmen have reportedly demanded 500,000 Naira (about $1,200) for each student.

Pandemic Olympics endured heat, and now a typhoon's en route

The Tokyo Olympics, delayed by the pandemic and opened under oppressive heat, are due for another hit of nature’s power: a typhoon arriving Tuesday morning that is forecast to disrupt at least some parts of the Games. Don’t worry, Japanese hosts say: In U.S. terms, the incoming weather is just a mid-grade tropical storm. And the surfers at Tsurigasaki beach say Tropical Storm Nepartak could actually improve the competition so long as it doesn’t hit the beach directly. But archery, rowing and sailing have already adjusted their Tuesday schedules. Tokyo Games spokesman Masa Takaya said there were no other changes expected.

Vatican trial opens into financial scandal rocking papacy

A cardinal who allegedly induced an underling to lie to prosecutors. Brokers and lawyers who pulled a fast one over the Vatican No. 2 to get him to approve a disastrous real estate deal. A self-styled intelligence analyst who bought Prada and Louis Vuitton items with the Vatican money that she was supposed to send to rebels holding a Catholic nun hostage. Vatican prosecutors have alleged a jaw-dropping series of scandals in the biggest criminal trial in the Vatican’s modern history, which opens Tuesday in a modified courtroom in the Vatican Museums. The once-powerful cardinal and nine other people are accused of bleeding the Holy See of tens of millions of dollars in donations through bad investments, deals with shady money managers and apparent favors to friends and family.

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