Ball State students hold protest for Jacob Blake

<p>Demonstrators kneel for 8 minutes and 42 seconds in memory of George Floyd at the University Green Tuesday Afternoon. The protest, which was organized by Ball State senior public communications major Taylor Hall, was attended by nearly 100 protesters.<strong> John Lynch, DN</strong></p>

Demonstrators kneel for 8 minutes and 42 seconds in memory of George Floyd at the University Green Tuesday Afternoon. The protest, which was organized by Ball State senior public communications major Taylor Hall, was attended by nearly 100 protesters. John Lynch, DN

Six feet apart, in masks and bearing signs that said "Black Lives Matter" and "Color is not a crime," Ball State students wish to make their voices heard once more.

On the University Greens, where campus had previously gathered over the summer in protest of the death of George Floyd, Ball State students gathered today in protest again.

Bella Gomez and Taylor Hall organized and held a protest against the shooting of Jacob Blake, a 29 year old Black man in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Hall said in an email that she and Gomez were both moved by seeing a video of the shooting.

"I organized multiple protest in Indianapolis over the summer and met with government officials to discuss these issues and wanted to be able to do something on campus too," she said over email.

At the start of the event, Hall asked that everyone do their best to socially distance, so that they could continue to follow university guidelines while protesting.

She said that there needs to be "actual action", such as signing petitions, registering to vote or working at a can food drive.

Kiarra Harbey, freshman criminology major attending the protest, said that having to do another one of these protests was "tiring."

"I'm just tired of it, waking up and seeing Black people murdered on the news everyday. It's just irritating," Harbey said

Ty Nibbs, a sophomore telecommunications major, was taking photos out at the event to document the experience, he said.

Nibbs said he hopes to be able to make a collage of what was happening, and even get a video together to "try and get something here that lets Ball State know what's going on."

"It's history. We are going through history. This is a revolution. Our generation and our age is [going to be the change,]" he said.

This story will be updated.

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