5 international stories of the week

<p>A demonstrator stands during a march in central Auckland, New Zealand, June 1, 2020, to protest the death of United States' George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. Floyd, who after a white police officer who is now charged with murder, Derek Chauvin, pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. <strong>(Dean Purcell/New Zealand Herald via AP)</strong></p>

A demonstrator stands during a march in central Auckland, New Zealand, June 1, 2020, to protest the death of United States' George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. Floyd, who after a white police officer who is now charged with murder, Derek Chauvin, pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for several minutes even after he stopped moving and pleading for air. (Dean Purcell/New Zealand Herald via AP)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Countries around the world responding to the death of George Floyd and U.S. protests, lockdowns easing in Europe and Asia, Vatican City’s efforts to cut down waste and corruption, China’s reaction to U.S. action on Hong Kong and people in Hong Kong applying for U.K. passports make up this week’s five international stories.


Demonstrators hold placards during a march in central Auckland, New Zealand, June 1, 2020, to protest the death of United States' George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. (Dean Purcell/New Zealand Herald via AP)

World’s reaction to US weaves solidarity, calls to change

Many people around the world have watched with growing unease at the civil unrest in the United States. after the latest in a series of police killings of black men and women. Demonstrations were held in multiple countries in support of American demonstrators while also protesting racism in their own countries. Officials from other countries also weighed in with their comments about the death of George Floyd and the protests in the United States.

Read more: George Floyd


Visitors admire the Sistine Chapel as the Vatican Museum reopened, in Rome, June 1, 2020. The Vatican Museums reopened Monday to visitors after three months of shutdown following COVID-19 containment measures. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Lockdowns ease across Europe, Asia with new tourism rules

The first day of June saw coronavirus restrictions ease from Asia to Europe on Monday, even as U.S. protests against police brutality sparked fears of new outbreaks. The Colosseum opened its ancient doors in Rome, ferries restarted in Bangladesh, golfers played in Greece, students returned in Britain and Dutch bars and restaurants were reopened. Countries around the Mediterranean Sea began to kickoff the season for tourists to bask in their sunny beaches. 

Read more: Virus Outbreak


Pope Francis delivers his blessing from his studio window overlooking St. Peter's Square, May 31, 2020, at the Vatican. Francis celebrated a Pentecost Mass in St. Peter's Basilica on Sunday, albeit without members of the public in attendance. (Vatican News via AP)

Vatican centralizes contracting to cut waste, corruption

The Vatican is centralizing its contracting and procurement procedures in a bid to cut waste, root out corruption and bring the Holy See’s finances into the 21st century. Pope Francis approved new norms governing contract bids and purchasing in his latest effort to reform the Vatican’s finances, which have grown even more precarious amid the coronavirus pandemic and closure of the Holy See’s main cash cow, the Vatican Museums.

Read more: Pope Francis


Pro-China supporters hold the effigy of U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese national flag outside the U.S. Consulate during a protest, in Hong Kong, May 30, 2020. President Donald Trump has announced a series of measures aimed at China as a rift between the two countries grows. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

China says US action on Hong Kong ‘doomed to fail’

The mouthpiece newspaper of China’s ruling Communist Party said that the U.S. decision to end some trading privileges for Hong Kong “grossly interferes” in China’s internal affairs and is “doomed to fail.” The Hong Kong government called President Donald Trump’s announcement unjustified and said it is “not unduly worried by such threats,” playing down concern that they could drive companies away from the Asian financial and trading center.

Read more: China


A protester holds up the British National (Overseas) passports in a shopping mall during a protest against China's national security legislation for the city, in Hong Kong, June 1, 2020. The mouthpiece of China's ruling Communist Party says U.S. moves to end some trading privileges extended to Hong Kong grossly interfere in China's internal affairs. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Hong Kong blocks Tiananmen vigil; rush on for UK passports

Hong Kong police rejected an application Monday for an annual candlelight vigil marking the anniversary this week of the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, as residents rushed to apply for passports that could allow them to move to the United Kingdom. Throngs of people lined up at DHL courier outlets across the city, many to send documents to the U.K. to apply for or renew what is known as a British National (Overseas) passport.

Read more: Hong Kong

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