5 international stories of the week

<p>Worshippers wearing protective face masks offer Eid al-Fitr prayers outside a mosque May 24, 2020, in Tehran, Iran. Muslims worldwide celebrate one of their biggest holidays under the long shadow of the coronavirus. <strong>(AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)</strong></p>

Worshippers wearing protective face masks offer Eid al-Fitr prayers outside a mosque May 24, 2020, in Tehran, Iran. Muslims worldwide celebrate one of their biggest holidays under the long shadow of the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Eid al-Fitr celebrations, the new travel restrictions on Brazil, protests in Hong Kong, the Israeli prime minister’s corruption trial and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on work to keep alive a nearly extinct subspecies of rhino make up this week’s five international stories.


Muslims wearing face masks attend the Eid al-Fitr prayers outside a mosque May 24, 2020, in Gaza City. Millions of muslims are marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, a usually joyous three-day celebration. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Muslims celebrate major holiday amid curfews, virus fears

Muslims around the world on Sunday began celebrating Eid al-Fitr, a normally festive holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, with millions under strict stay-at-home orders and many fearing renewed coronavirus outbreaks. The three-day holiday is a time of travel, family get-togethers and lavish daytime feasts after weeks of dawn-to-dusk fasting. But this year many of the world’s 1.8 billion Muslims will have to pray at home and make do with video calls.

Read more: Religion


Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro joins in a protest against the Supreme Court and Brazil's National Congress, May 17, 2020, in Brasilia, Brazil. (AP Photo/Andre Borges, File)

White House imposes coronavirus travel ban on Brazil

President Donald Trump on Sunday further limited travel from the world’s coronavirus hotspots by denying entry to foreigners coming from Brazil, which is second to the U.S. in the number of confirmed cases. Trump had already banned certain travelers from China, Europe, U.K. and Ireland and, to a lesser extent, Iran. He has not moved to ban travel from Russia, which has the world’s third-highest caseload. Last week, he said he was considering limiting travel from Brazil.

Read more: Italy


Riot police detain a protester during a demonstration in Causeway Bay, May 24, 2020, in Hong Kong. Police fired volleys of tear gas in a popular shopping district as hundreds took to the streets Sunday to march against China's proposed tough national security legislation for the city. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Hong Kong police fire tear gas, water cannon at protesters

Hong Kong police fired tear gas and a water cannon at protesters in a popular shopping district Sunday, as thousands took to the streets to march against China’s move to impose national security legislation on the city. Pro-democracy supporters have sharply criticized a proposal, set to be approved by China’s rubber-stamp parliament this week, that would ban secessionist and subversive activity, as well as foreign interference, in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

Read more: Hong Kong


Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, second right, stands while the judges enter the court room as his corruption trial opens May 24, 2020, at the Jerusalem District Court. He is the country’s first sitting prime minister ever to go on trial. (Ronen Zvulun/ Pool Photo via AP)

Israel’s Netanyahu attacks justice system as trial begins

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu strode into a Jerusalem courtroom Sunday to face corruption charges in a long-awaited trial that has overshadowed three inconclusive elections and deeply divided the country. Israel’s first sitting prime minister to go on trial launched into a lengthy tirade against the nation’s justice system in which he accused police, prosecutors, judges and the media of a conspiracy aimed to oust him against the will of the people.

Read more: Israel


Female northern white rhinos Fatu, 19, right, and Najin, 30, left, the last two northern white rhinos on the planet, are fed some carrots by a ranger Aug. 23, 2019, in their enclosure at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

Virus stalls work to keep alive a rare rhino subspecies

Groundbreaking work to keep alive the nearly extinct northern white rhino subspecies — population, two — by in-vitro fertilization has been stalled by travel restrictions. And time is running out. The two northern white rhinos are female. The goal is to create viable embryos in a lab by inseminating their eggs with frozen sperm from dead males, then transfer them into a surrogate mother, a more common southern white rhino. 

Read more: Kenya

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