5 national stories of the week

<p>Kim and 4-year-old Marley Farwell, of Stowe, Vt., walk through the greenhouse at Evergreen Gardens of Vermont April 27, 2020, in Waterbury Center, Vt. Monday was the the first day businesses such as greenhouses and garden centers could allow a small number of customers inside as part of Vermont's gradual coronavirus pandemic reopening plan. <strong>(AP Photo/Wilson Ring)</strong></p>

Kim and 4-year-old Marley Farwell, of Stowe, Vt., walk through the greenhouse at Evergreen Gardens of Vermont April 27, 2020, in Waterbury Center, Vt. Monday was the the first day businesses such as greenhouses and garden centers could allow a small number of customers inside as part of Vermont's gradual coronavirus pandemic reopening plan. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from across the United States. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

The president urging schools to reopen before summer, the first completely mail-in primary in Ohio, the Supreme Court holding arguments by telephone, a new opportunity for House Democrats to force former a former White House counsel to testify before Congress and easing restrictions in rural United States make up this week’s five national stories.


President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the Rose Garden of the White House April 27, 2020, in Washington. Trump says states should “seriously consider” reopening their public schools before the end of the academic year. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump urges states to consider opening schools before summer

President Donald Trump says states should “seriously consider” reopening their public schools before the end of the academic year, even though dozens already have said it would be unsafe for students to return until the summer or fall. Trump made the comments Monday in a call with governors discussing how to reopen their economies, among other topics, but none of the governors on the call responded to the suggestion, according to a recording obtained by AP.

Read More: Donald Trump


Jim O'Bryan drops his election ballot in the drop box at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections April 22, 2020, in Cleveland. Ohio’s primary will be the nation’s first major test of an almost completely vote-by-mail election. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

Ohio’s mail-in primary tests voting during virus outbreak

The first major test of an almost completely vote-by-mail election during a pandemic is about to unfold in Ohio, offering lessons to other states about how to conduct one of the most basic acts of democracy amid a health crisis. The process hasn’t been smooth as state officials have navigated election laws and the need to protect citizens and poll workers from the coronavirus. Ohio’s primary was delayed just hours before polls were supposed to open last month.

Read More: Election 2020


The empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court June 24, 2019, in Washington. Because of the coronavirus pandemic the Supreme Court is holding arguments by phone for the first time in its 230-year history. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Blind justice: No visual cues in high court phone cases

Because of the coronavirus pandemic The Supreme Court is, for the first time in its 230-year history, holding arguments by telephone. The court will hear teleconference arguments in 10 cases over six days — an unprecedented decision in an effort to help slow the spread of the virus. Most of the justices are at risk because of their age; six are over 65. Hearing arguments by phone allows them to decide significant cases by the court’s traditional summer break.

Read more: U.S. Supreme Court


Then-White House counsel Don McGahn listens as Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee Sept. 27, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The federal appeals court in Washington, is giving the House another shot at forcing McGahn to appear before Congress. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP, File)

New chance for House Democrats to force McGahn’s testimony

The federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., is giving the House another shot at forcing former White House counsel Don McGahn to appear before Congress. Nine of the Democratic-dominated court’s 11 judges are hearing arguments by telephone Tuesday in a dispute between House Democrats and President Donald Trump’s administration over a subpoena for McGahn’s testimony that was issued a year ago by a House committee.

Read more: Politics


Nicole Snider makes a sale to Shannon Thompson at the Northern Treasure thrift store April 27, 2020 in Roundup, Mont. Thompson said there has been little fear over the coronavirus in the rural town. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)

Fears of virus seem far away as stores reopen in rural US

Parts of the U.S. are starting to lift closures — some of the quickest being rural states like Montana, Vermont and Alaska. The effects of the pandemic in small towns can seem a world away from cities grappling with overwhelmed hospitals, packed morgues and economies pushed to the brink. The consequences of easing restrictions in rural communities won’t be fully known for some time, and health officials will be watching closely for a resurgence of infections.

Read More: Virus outbreak

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