Sierra Club: Toxic pollutant limits good news for Indiana

Hazardous waste crews, working with the EPA, measure the area of the upper pond that has turned orange from rust and contains mercury and sulfuric acid as seen at the deserted New Idria mercury mines, October 25, 2011. The mines, in rural San Benito County, were once a bustling community, but now the miners are gone, and the pollution remains. (Karen T. Borchers/San Jose Mercury News/MCT)
Hazardous waste crews, working with the EPA, measure the area of the upper pond that has turned orange from rust and contains mercury and sulfuric acid as seen at the deserted New Idria mercury mines, October 25, 2011. The mines, in rural San Benito County, were once a bustling community, but now the miners are gone, and the pollution remains. (Karen T. Borchers/San Jose Mercury News/MCT)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Sierra Club says new federal standards for mercury, lead and other toxic pollutants that coal-fired power plants discharge into rivers and streams are good news for Indiana's waterways and its residents.

Jodi Perras (PEHR'-ihs), the Indiana representative of the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign, calls the standards "a victory for every Hoosier who wants to swim in clean rivers, eat healthy fish, and drink clean water."

Perras says a 2013 report from a coalition of environmental groups found that only three of Indiana's 19 coal-fired power plants had permits that limited their toxic heavy metal discharges into public waters.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the new standards announced Wednesday will provide significant protections for American children and communities from exposure to pollutants that can cause serious health problems.

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