Five international stories of the week

The candidate for the Presidency of Peru, Keiko Fujimori, of the Popular Force party, speaks before her supporters during the closing of the campaign for the second presidential round on June 6, at the Las Palomas oval in the district of Villa El Salvador, in Lima, Peru, on June 3, 2021. (John Reyes/EFE/Zuma Press/TNS) * USA and Canada English Language Rights Only *
The candidate for the Presidency of Peru, Keiko Fujimori, of the Popular Force party, speaks before her supporters during the closing of the campaign for the second presidential round on June 6, at the Las Palomas oval in the district of Villa El Salvador, in Lima, Peru, on June 3, 2021. (John Reyes/EFE/Zuma Press/TNS) * USA and Canada English Language Rights Only *

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

A train crash in Pakistan kills 40 people, France fines Google for unfair online ads treatment, Mexico president appears to hold majority in elections, the daughter of an imprisoned ex-president leads Peru's election and a Seoul court rejects a slave labor claim against Japanese firms makes up this week's five international stories.

Train barrels into another in Pakistan, killing at least 40

An express train barreled into another that had derailed in Pakistan before dawn Monday, killing at least 40 people, authorities said. More than 100 were injured, and rescuers and villagers worked throughout the day to pull survivors and the dead from the crumpled cars. Cries for help pierced the night as passengers climbed out of overturned or crushed rail cars, and local people rushed to the scene in the district of Ghotki, in the southern province of Sindh. Later in the day, heavy machinery arrived to cut open some cars, in the hopes of rescuing several people still believed to be trapped. The military deployed troops and helicopters to assist.

France fines Google $268M for unfair online ads treatment

France’s anti-competition watchdog decided Monday to fine Google 220 million euros ($268 million) for abusing its “dominant position” in the online advertising business, an unprecedented move, the body said. Practices used by Google “are particularly serious because they penalize Google’s competitors” in certain markets and publishers of mobile sites and applications, the statement by the Competition Authority said. Google, based in Mountain View, California, did not dispute the facts and opted to settle, proposing changes, the statement said.

Mexico president appears to hold key majority in elections

President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s party and its allies appeared poised to maintain their majority in Mexico’s lower chamber of the congress, according to initial results. Electoral authorities released “quick count” results based on voting samples that allow estimates of the voting trends to determine the rough potential makeup of the Chamber of Deputies late Sunday. López Obrador’s Morena party will have to rely on votes from its allies in the Workers Party and Green Party, but together they were expected to capture between 265 and 292 seats in the 500-seat chamber. Morena alone was expected to win 190 to 203 seats.

Daughter of imprisoned ex-president leads Peru's election

The daughter of an imprisoned former president was leading the race for Peru’s presidency late Sunday, hours after polls closed in a runoff election held as the coronavirus pandemic continues to batter the Andean country. With 42% of votes tallied, conservative Keiko Fujimori had 52.9% of the vote, while rural teacher-turned-political novice Pedro Castillo had 47%, according to official results. This is Fujimori’s third run for president, a role her father held in the 1990s. The polarizing populist candidates have promised coronavirus vaccines for all and other strategies to alleviate the health emergency that has killed more than 180,000 people in Peru and pushed millions into poverty.

Seoul court rejects slave labor claim against Japanese firms

A South Korean court on Monday rejected a claim by dozens of World War II-era Korean factory workers and their relatives who sought compensation from 16 Japanese companies for their slave labor during Japan’s colonial occupation of Korea. The decision by the Seoul Central District Court appeared to run against landmark Supreme Court rulings in 2018 that ordered Nippon Steel and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to compensate Korean forced laborers. A total of 85 plaintiffs had sought a combined 8.6 billion won ($7.7 million) in damages from 16 Japanese companies, including Nippon Steel, Nissan Chemical and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

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