Five international stories of the week

Members of Syria's Civil Defence service sift through the rubble at Al-Shifaa hospital following shelling of the rebel-held city of Afrin in northern Syria, on June 12, 2021. Shelling of the rebel-held city of Afrin in northern Syria killed at least 16 people, many of them when a hospital was struck, a war monitor said. (BAKR ALKASEM/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
Members of Syria's Civil Defence service sift through the rubble at Al-Shifaa hospital following shelling of the rebel-held city of Afrin in northern Syria, on June 12, 2021. Shelling of the rebel-held city of Afrin in northern Syria killed at least 16 people, many of them when a hospital was struck, a war monitor said. (BAKR ALKASEM/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

G-7 leaders agree on vaccines, China and taxing corporations, Israel swears in a new coalition, Nicaragua arrests five more opposition leaders in a crackdown, Americans stand trial in Japan and there was major wreckage at a hospital hit by artillery in north Syria makes up this week's five international stories.

G-7 leaders agree on vaccines, China and taxing corporations

Leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy nations staked their claim Sunday to leading the world out of the coronavirus pandemic and crisis, pledging more than 1 billion coronavirus vaccine doses to poorer nations, vowing to help developing countries grow while fighting climate change and backing a minimum tax on multinational firms. At the group’s first face-to-face meeting in two years, the leaders dangled promises of support for global health, green energy, infrastructure and education — all to demonstrate that international cooperation is back after the upheavals caused by the pandemic and the unpredictability of former U.S. President Donald Trump.

Israel swears in new coalition, ending Netanyahu's long rule

Israel’s parliament on Sunday narrowly approved a new coalition government, ending the historic 12-year rule of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and sending the polarizing leader into the opposition. Naftali Bennett, a former ally of Netanyahu turned rival, became prime minister after the 60-59 vote. Promising to try to heal a divided nation, Bennett will preside over a diverse and fragile coalition comprised of eight parties with deep ideological differences. The vote, capping a stormy parliamentary session, ended a two-year cycle of political paralysis in which the country held four deadlocked elections.

Nicaragua arrests five more leaders in crackdown

The government of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega arrested five opposition leaders during a major weekend round up, in what appears to be widespread detentions of anyone who might challenge his rule. The four arrests Sunday and one Saturday suggest Ortega has moved beyond arresting potential rival candidates in the Nov. 7 elections, and has begun arresting any prominent member of the opposition. The arrests bring to 12 the number of opponents detained since June 2. On Sunday, police also arrested prominent ex-Sandinista dissident Dora María Téllez, another opposition leader, Ana Margarita Vijil, and Suyen Barahona, leader of the political movement Unamos.

Americans stand trial in Japan, accused in Ghosn's escape

Two Americans suspected of helping former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn flee Japan while he was out on bail go on trial Monday in Tokyo. Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret, and his son Peter Taylor are suspected in the Houdini-like operation where Ghosn hid in a box for music equipment that was loaded onto a private jet that flew him to Lebanon, via Turkey in December 2019. Unlike the U.S., Lebanon has no extradition treaty with Japan. Ghosn has French, Lebanese and Brazilian citizenship. The Taylors were arrested in Massachusetts in May last year and extradited in March on charges of helping a criminal. The authorities say Ghosn hired the Taylors for at least $1.3 million.

Major wreckage at hospital hit by artillery in north Syria

The death toll from an artillery strike on a hospital in northern Syria has risen to at least 15, medical officials said Sunday. The shelling, a day earlier, caused widespread destruction and knocked out the hospital’s maternity ward and surgery unit. It was not immediately clear who was behind the attack that also wounded 43 and came from areas where both government troops and Kurdish-led fighters are deployed. Al-Shifaa hospital is in the northern town of Afrin, in an area controlled by Turkey-backed Syrian opposition fighters. Much of the ceiling of the facility collapsed, and electricity cables dangled in a main corridor.

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