Five international stories of the week

<p>In this handout photo provided by the Italian state police, emergency workers surround the wreckage of a cable car that fell from the Stresa-Alpine-Mottarone line on May 23, 2021 in Stresa, Italy. After initial confusion over the number of passengers, Italian news outlets reported that 15 people had been riding in the cable car before it fell, and officials said two children were taken from the accident site to a hospital in Turin. <strong>(Handout photo by the Italian State Police via Getty Images/TNS)</strong></p>

In this handout photo provided by the Italian state police, emergency workers surround the wreckage of a cable car that fell from the Stresa-Alpine-Mottarone line on May 23, 2021 in Stresa, Italy. After initial confusion over the number of passengers, Italian news outlets reported that 15 people had been riding in the cable car before it fell, and officials said two children were taken from the accident site to a hospital in Turin. (Handout photo by the Italian State Police via Getty Images/TNS)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

India surpasses 300,000 COVID-19 deaths, Italy probes a cable car crash, Iran agrees to extend a deal on cameras at its nuclear sites, the U.S. reaches out to Palestinian leaders and Japan opens mass vaccination centers two months before the Olympics make up this week's five international stories.

India virus death toll surpasses 300,000, 3rd highest in world

India crossed another grim milestone Monday with more than 300,000 people lost to the coronavirus, while a devastating surge of infections appeared to be easing in big cities but was swamping the poorer countryside. The milestone, as recorded by India’s Health Ministry, comes as slowed vaccine deliveries have marred the country’s fight against the pandemic, forcing many to miss their shots, and a rare but fatal fungal infection affecting COVID-19 patients has worried doctors.

Italy probes cable car crash as lone child survivor recovers

Italy’s transport minister vowed Monday to establish the cause of a cable car disaster that killed 14 people, after the lead cable apparently snapped and the cabin careened back down the mountain until it came off the line and crashed to the ground. The lone survivor of Sunday’s horrific incident, a 5-year-old Israeli boy living in Italy, remained hospitalized in Turin on Monday with multiple broken bones.

Iran agrees to extend deal on cameras at its nuclear sites

Iran and the U.N.’s nuclear watchdog agreed on Monday to a one-month extension to a deal on surveillance cameras at Tehran’s atomic sites, buying more time for ongoing negotiations seeking to save the country’s tattered nuclear deal with world powers. The Islamic Republic is already enriching and stockpiling uranium at levels far beyond those allowed by its 2015 nuclear deal.

US reaches out to Palestinian leaders many angrily reject

After weeks of unrest and a devastating 11-day war in Gaza, the U.S. and the international community plan to engage with the Palestinians to revive peace efforts. But when U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken visits on Tuesday, he will meet with Palestinian leaders who were sidelined by the protests and outmaneuvered by the militant Hamas group — and who seem to be more despised by Palestinians than at any time in their long reign.

Japan opens mass vaccine centers 2 months before Olympics

Japan mobilized military doctors and nurses to give shots to elderly people in Tokyo and Osaka on Monday as the government desperately tries to accelerate its vaccination rollout and curb coronavirus infections just two months before hosting the Olympics. Worries about public safety while many Japanese remain unvaccinated have prompted growing protests and calls for canceling the games, set to start on July 23.

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