Five international stories of the week

A vehicle with Myanmar and military flags and supporters of the Myanmar military and the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party passes by a row of police trucks with police security onboard parked near the Kyauktada police station in Yangon, Myanmar Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. Myanmar military television said Monday that the military was taking control of the country for one year. (AP Photo)
A vehicle with Myanmar and military flags and supporters of the Myanmar military and the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party passes by a row of police trucks with police security onboard parked near the Kyauktada police station in Yangon, Myanmar Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. Myanmar military television said Monday that the military was taking control of the country for one year. (AP Photo)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Myanmar’s military siezes the government, AstraZeneca will supply 9 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to the EU, 13 people were killed in separate incidents of violence in Syria, Europe's human rights court condemned Russia for violations in 2008 war with Georgia and Mexico's president works from isolation after a positive COVID-19 test make up this week's five international stories.

In this photo released by The Military True News Information Team, Myanmar Acting President Myint Swe, center, military chief Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, standing at left, and other military members of National Defence and Security Council attend a meeting at Presidential Palace in Naypyitaw, Myanmar Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. (The Military True News Information Team via AP)

Military stages coup in Myanmar, detains Aung San Suu Kyi

Myanmar’s military staged a coup Monday and detained senior politicians including Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi — a sharp reversal of the significant, if uneven, progress toward democracy the Southeast Asian nation has made following five decades of military rule. An announcement read on military-owned Myawaddy TV said the military would take control of the country for one year. It said the seizure was necessary because the government had not acted on the military’s claims of fraud in November’s elections and allowed the election to go ahead despite the coronavirus pandemic. 

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen speaks during a joint news conference with European Council President Charles Michel at the end of a EU summit video conference at the European Council headquarters in Brussels, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. European Union leaders assessed more measures to counter the spread of coronavirus variants during a video summit Thursday as the bloc's top disease control official said urgent action was needed to stave off a new wave of hospitalizations and deaths. (Olivier Hoslet, Pool Photo via AP)

EU: AstraZeneca to supply 9 million more vaccine doses

Pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca has agreed to supply 9 million additional doses of its coronavirus vaccine to the European Union during the first quarter, the bloc’s executive arm said Sunday. The new target of 40 million doses by the end of March is still only half what the British-Swedish company had originally aimed for before it announced a shortfall due to production problems, triggering a spat between AstraZeneca and the EU last week. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said after a call with seven vaccine makers Sunday that AstraZeneca will also begin deliveries one week sooner than scheduled and expand its manufacturing capacity in Europe.

In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, pro-government demonstrators protest the siege on their neighborhood by Kurdish security forces, in Hassakeh, Syria, Sunday, Jan. 31, 2021. The state news agency SANA said one Syrian was killed and four injured after Kurdish security forces opened fire at pro-government demonstrators in Hassakeh. (SANA via AP)

13 killed in car bombs, shooting in northern Syria

One Syrian was killed on Sunday and four injured after Kurdish security forces opened fire at pro-government demonstrators in a northeastern city, state media said. Separately, two car bombs went off two hours apart in the northwestern town of Azaz and another village some 50 kilometers (30 miles) away. The explosions — in the areas controlled by Syrian opposition fighters allied with Turkey — killed six civilians, including one child in Azaz, and six fighters at a checkpoint in a village near the town of al-Bab, first responders known as Syrian Civil Defense and opposition media reported.

FILE - In this Thursday, Aug. 14, 2008 file photo, Russian soldiers block the road on the outskirts of Gori, northwest of the capital Tbilisi, Georgia. The European Court of Human Rights ruled Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021 that Russia was responsible for a swathe of violations in Georgia's breakaway regions after the 2008 Russia-Georgia war. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic, File)

Europe's court condemns Russia over 2008 war with Georgia

Europe’s top human rights court on Thursday found Russia responsible for a swath of violations in Georgia’s breakaway regions after the 2008 Russia-Georgia war. In its case against Russia, Georgia accused it of violating the European Convention on Human Rights both during and after the war, but the European Court of Human Rights only accepted the Georgian complaints related to the period after the fighting. The court found Russia responsible for ill-treatment and acts of torture against Georgian prisoners of war, arbitrary detentions of Georgians and “inhuman and degrading treatment” of 160 detained Georgian civilians.

FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2020 file photo, Mexican President Andres Manuel López Obrador gives his daily, morning news conference at the presidential palace, Palacio Nacional, in Mexico City. López Obrador said he has tested positive for COVID-19 and is under medical treatment, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)


Mexican president works from isolation after virus test

Mexico President Andrés Manuel López Obrador worked from isolation last week, after announcing that he tested positive for COVID-19. He was absent from his daily news conference for the first time in his two years in office. The president, who has rarely been seen wearing a mask, stayed out of sight as his country topped 150,000 deaths, the fourth-highest level in the world. He has been criticized for his handling of Mexico’s pandemic and for not setting an example of prevention in public. López Obrador said Jan. 30 he thinks the worst of his illness is over and he is focusing attention on securing more COVID-19 vaccines for Mexico.

Comments

More from The Daily






This Week's Digital Issue