Five international stories of the week

Residents traveling in the bed of a pickup truck wait on a road blocked by debris brought on by a landslide in the aftermath of Hurricane Eta, in Purulha, northern Guatemala Friday, Nov. 6, 2020. As the remnants of Eta moved back over Caribbean waters, governments in Central America worked to tally the displaced and dead, and recover bodies from landslides and flooding that claimed dozens of lives from Guatemala to Panama. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
Residents traveling in the bed of a pickup truck wait on a road blocked by debris brought on by a landslide in the aftermath of Hurricane Eta, in Purulha, northern Guatemala Friday, Nov. 6, 2020. As the remnants of Eta moved back over Caribbean waters, governments in Central America worked to tally the displaced and dead, and recover bodies from landslides and flooding that claimed dozens of lives from Guatemala to Panama. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Residents of an Indian village celebrate Kamala Harris' election win, Italy enforces lockdowns in four regions, U.K. prime minister Boris Johnson aims to build a relationship with Joe Biden, Guatemala copes with the aftermath of tropical storm Eta and Portugal and Hungary enforce curfews to combat the coronavirus' resurgence.

Villagers burst firecrackers to celebrate the victory of U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris in Painganadu a neighboring village of Thulasendrapuram, the hometown of Harris' maternal grandfather, south of Chennai, Tamil Nadu state, India, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2020. Waking up to the news of Kamala Harris' election as Joe Biden's running mate, overjoyed people in her small ancestral Indian village set off firecrackers, carried her placards and offered prayers. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

Firecrackers and prayers as Indians celebrate Harris' win

Waking up to the news of Kamala Harris’ election as U.S. vice president, overjoyed people in her Indian grandfather’s hometown set off firecrackers and offered prayers on Sunday. Groups gathered at street corners in Thulasendrapuram, a tiny village of 350 people, reading newspapers and chatting about Joe Biden and Harris’ victory before moving to a temple. Most of them had gone to sleep by the time Biden clinched the winning threshold of 270 Electoral College votes, making Harris the first woman and the first person of South Asian descent to be elected vice president.

Women walk in the Vittorio Emanuele II gallery shopping arcade in Milan, Italy, Friday, Nov. 6, 2020. Lombardy is among the four Italian regions classified as red zones, where a strict lockdown was imposed starting Friday - to be reassessed in two weeks - in an effort to curb the COVID-19 infections growing curve. Beginning Nov. 6, only shops selling food and other essentials were allowed to open. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Italy shuts down four regions as Europe tries lighter lockdowns

Italy enforced a partial lockdown in four regions beginning Nov. 6, aiming to stop the coronavirus’s resurgence. The new restrictions — which led to closures of a patchwork of nonessential businesses — allow a great deal more freedom than Italy’s near-total 10-week lockdown that started in March, but nonetheless brought recriminations from regional governments that feel unfairly targeted. In particular, the south, which was largely spared in the spring, chafed the most, despite concerns that its weaker health care system was especially vulnerable.

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks with veterans, during the Remembrance Sunday service at the Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, Sunday Nov. 8, 2020. Johnson says Britain and the United States will work together to support democracy and combat climate change. He denies that his close ties to President Donald Trump would hurt U.K.-U.S relations once President-elect Joe Biden takes office in January. (Chris Jackson/Pool Photo via AP)

UK's Johnson, praised by Trump, seeks new UK bond with Biden

Boris Johnson’s famous charm worked wonders on Donald Trump, but he faces a tougher audience in Joe Biden. Britain’s prime minister promised Sunday to work with the U.S. president-elect to spread democracy, defend human rights and combat climate change, as he sought to woo a leader who sees the world very differently to the outgoing American leader. In an interview with The Associated Press in 10 Downing St.. Johnson stressed the strength of trans-Atlantic ties, saying the two countries’ “common global perspective” would be vital to shore up a rules-based global order that is under threat.

A resident walking through a flooded street looks back at storm damage caused by Hurricane Eta in Planeta, Honduras, Friday, Nov. 6, 2020. Eta's slow, meandering path north through Honduras pushed rivers over their banks and pouring into neighborhoods where families were forced onto rooftops to wait for rescue. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

Guatemala digs through landslide where 100 believed buried

Guatemalan search brigades pulled the first bodies Friday from a massive rain-fueled landslide where at least 100 people are believed to be entombed, as the remains of Hurricane Eta moved across Caribbean waters, strengthening en route to Cuba. Governments worked to tally the displaced and dead, and recover bodies from landslides and flooding caused by Eta, now a tropical depression, that claimed dozens of lives from Mexico to Panama. Guatemala President Alejandro Giammattei said he believed there were at least 100 dead in San Cristobal Verapaz, but noted that was still unconfirmed.

Workers of a nursing home are being tested with a PCR test in Ammerschwihr, eastern France, Monday, Nov.9, 2020. The antigen tests can give results in 15-30 minutes, and if they turn out positive, the patient is sent for a PCR test to confirm the result. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

Portugal, Hungary hunker down against Europe's virus surge

Portugal and Hungary on Monday became the latest European countries to impose curfews against the resurgent tide of coronavirus infections and deaths lashing the continent and filing its emergency wards. But glimmers of hope emerged from France, Belgium and elsewhere that tough restrictions might be starting to work. Portugal, which like other European countries has seen new cases and hospital admissions surge in recent weeks, imposed a state of emergency and ordered some 7 million people — around 70% of its population — to stay home on weeknights from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. for at least the next two weeks.

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