Five national stories of the week

Karen Simon from the District of Columbia, left, waves a banner together with other supporters of President Donald Trump, gathered outside the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. Trump said Monday he's leaving the military hospital where he has been treated for COVID-19 and will continue his recovery at the White House. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Karen Simon from the District of Columbia, left, waves a banner together with other supporters of President Donald Trump, gathered outside the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. Trump said Monday he's leaving the military hospital where he has been treated for COVID-19 and will continue his recovery at the White House. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

President Donald Trump returns to the White House to recover from COVID-19, the CDC release new guidance for socially distant indoor events, the officer wounded in Breonna Taylor protests recovers from surgery, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo closes some Brooklyn and Queens schools and Rochester mayor defends herself against a grand jury indictment on scheming to violate election laws.

President Donald Trump stands on the balcony outside of the Blue Room as returns to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md. Trump announced he tested positive for COVID-19 on Oct. 2. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump, still infectious, back at White House — without mask

President Donald Trump staged a dramatic return to the White House after leaving the military hospital where he was receiving an unprecedented level of care for COVID-19. He immediately ignited a new controversy by declaring that despite his illness the nation should not fear the virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans — and then he entered the White House without a protective mask. Trump’s message alarmed infectious disease experts and suggested the president’s own illness had not caused him to rethink his often-cavalier attitude toward the disease.

FILE - This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, but agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)

CDC says coronavirus can spread indoors in updated guidance

The top U.S. public health agency said Monday that the coronavirus can spread more than 6 feet through the air, especially in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials maintained that such spread is uncommon and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. However, several experts faulted the updated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance. They said the virus can spread more easily than the CDC seems to be indicating, and suggested that the public should wear masks even in prolonged outdoor gatherings when they are more than 6 feet apart.

FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2020, file photo, Black Lives Matter protesters march in Louisville. Louisville Metro Police Officer Robinson Desroches was shot Sept. 23 and was released from the hospital Sunday. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Officer wounded in Breonna Taylor protests out of hospital

A police officer wounded during protests rekindled by the announcement that no officers were being charged in the death of Breonna Taylor has been released from the hospital. Louisville Metro Police Officer Robinson Desroches and another officer were shot on Sept. 23 during protests held after prosecutors announced a single officer had been indicted on charges of wanton endangerment for firing into a home next to Taylor’s, but not on charges involving the Black woman’s death. Desroches was shot in the abdomen and underwent surgery. He was released from the hospital Sunday.

Music teacher Cheryl Johnson leaves Edward R. Murrow High School, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in the Midwood section of the Brooklyn borough of New York. The school is among schools in certain city neighborhoods with rising coronavirus rates that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered to close on Tuesday to stem the spread of the virus. Cuomo warned that he will close down temples and churches too if compliance with social distancing rules doesn't improve. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Governor orders some NYC schools closed amid virus flare-up

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday ordered schools in certain New York City neighborhoods closed within a day in an attempt to halt flare-ups of the coronavirus. The governor took the action a day after the city’s mayor, Bill de Blasio, asked the state for permission to reinstate restrictions on schools and businesses in nine ZIP codes in Brooklyn and Queens where the virus was spreading more quickly than in other parts of the city. Cuomo said the closures would take place by Tuesday and said schools in those areas hadn’t been testing students for the virus to identify possible outbreaks and he could no longer guarantee they were safe.

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren walks out of city court after her arraignment in Rochester, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. Warren, who has faced calls to resign over her city's handling of the suffocation death of Daniel Prude at the hands of police, pleaded not guilty Monday to campaign finance charges dating to her 2017 reelection campaign. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)

Rochester mayor pleads not guilty in campaign finance case

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren, who has faced calls to resign over her city’s handling of the suffocation death of Daniel Prude at the hands of police, pleaded not guilty Monday to campaign finance charges dating to her 2017 reelection campaign. A lawyer for the second-term mayor, a Democrat, entered the plea on her behalf. Warren had been indicted Friday by a grand jury on charges of scheming to defraud and violating election laws. Warren’s lawyer says she did not intentionally break any law and is ready to fight the charges.

Comments

More from The Daily







This Week's Digital Issue