5 national stories of the week

<p>City of Tupelo Community Outreach Coordinator Marcus Gary takes down the Mississippi state flag that flew over the City Hall of Tupelo one last time June 29, 2020. Mississippi is retiring the last state flag in the U.S. that includes the Confederate battle emblem. <strong>(Thomas Wells/The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal via AP, File)</strong></p>

City of Tupelo Community Outreach Coordinator Marcus Gary takes down the Mississippi state flag that flew over the City Hall of Tupelo one last time June 29, 2020. Mississippi is retiring the last state flag in the U.S. that includes the Confederate battle emblem. (Thomas Wells/The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal via AP, File)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from across the United States. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Mississippi taking down its state flag, Supreme Court rulings on an abortion-related case and state aid to religious schooling, the Golden State Killer’s admission to several rape and murder cases and the death of the creator of “The Dick Van Dyke Show” make up this week’s five national stories.


Sen. Briggs Hopson, R-Vicksburg, left, is congratulated by Sen. Hillman Frazier, D-Jackson after the Senate voted to change the Mississippi state flag at the Capitol June 28, 2020, in Jackson, Miss. Hopson presented the bill to the body. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

Confederate flag losing prominence 155 years after Civil War

Long a symbol of pride to some and hatred to others, the Confederate battle flag is losing its place of official prominence 155 years after rebellious Southern states lost a war to perpetuate slavery. The legislature in Mississippi, the last state whose flag included the Confederate flag, voted Sunday to remove the Civil War emblem from the state flag. This move was notable for its swiftness amid national debate over racial inequality following the police killing of George Floyd

Read More: Mississippi


Anti-abortion activists wait in vain outside the Supreme Court for a decision, June 25, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Supreme Court’s abortion ruling raises stakes for election

Supporters of abortion rights are elated, foes of abortion dismayed and angry, but they agree on one consequence of the Supreme Court’s first major abortion ruling since President Donald Trump took office: The upcoming election is crucial to their cause. The Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision Monday, struck down a Louisiana law seeking to require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Read More: U.S. Supreme Court


The Supreme Court is seen on Capitol Hill June 29, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Supreme Court lifts ban on state aid to religious schooling

States can’t cut religious schools out of programs that send public money to private education, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. By a 5-4 vote with the conservatives in the majority, the justices upheld a Montana scholarship program that allows state tax credits for private schooling in which almost all the recipients attend religious schools. Previously, the Montana Supreme Court ruled the tax credit violated the state constitution’s ban on state aid to religious schools.

Read more: Education


Joseph James DeAngelo, charged with being the Golden State Killer, is helped up by his attorney June 29, 2020, in Sacramento, Calif. DeAngelo pleaded guilty to multiple counts of murder and other charges 40 years after a sadistic series of assaults and slayings in California. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Golden State Killer admits to dozens of rapes, 13 murders

A former police officer who terrorized California as a serial burglar and rapist and went on to kill more than a dozen people while evading capture for decades pleaded guilty Monday to murders attributed to the Golden State Killer. Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. had remained almost silent in court since his 2018 arrest until he repeatedly uttered the words “guilty” and “I admit” in a hushed and raspy voice as part of a plea agreement that will spare him the death penalty.

Read More: Crime


Carl Reiner shows holds two Emmy statuettes presented to him as best comedy writer for the "Dick Van Dyke Show," during the annual Emmy Awards presentation May 26, 1963, in Los Angeles. Reiner, 98, died of natural causes June 29, 2020. (AP Photo, File)

Carl Reiner, beloved creator of ‘Dick Van Dyke Show,’ dies

Carl Reiner, 98, the writer, actor and director who broke through as a “second banana” to Sid Caesar and rose to comedy’s front ranks as creator of “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and straight man to Mel Brooks’ “2000 Year Old Man,” died Monday night of natural causes at his home in Beverly Hills, California. Reiner was a welcome face on the small and silver screens in films as “The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming” and “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.”

Read more: Carl Reiner

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