5 national stories of the week

<p>A crowd of demonstrators march to the Capitol. The NAACP March to the Capitol coincided with the restart of the Georgia 2020 General Assembly Monday, June 15, 2020 in Atlanta. <strong>(Steve Schaefer/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)</strong></p>

A crowd of demonstrators march to the Capitol. The NAACP March to the Capitol coincided with the restart of the Georgia 2020 General Assembly Monday, June 15, 2020 in Atlanta. (Steve Schaefer/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from across the United States. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

A poll reflecting the unhappiness in the U.S. in 2020, Atlanta mayor’s vow to change use of force by police officers, changes to policing being sought by President Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans, a partial rebound for U.S. retail sales and the Academy Awards being delayed make up this week’s five national stories.


A merchant prepares a floral arrangement on Mother's Day at the Los Angeles Flower Market May 10, 2020, in Los Angeles. Americans are more unhappy today than they’ve been in nearly 50 years. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Poll: Americans are the unhappiest they’ve been in 50 years

2020 has been rough on the American psyche with people more unhappy today than they’ve been in nearly 50 years. This conclusion comes from the COVID Response Tracking Study, conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago. It finds that just 14 percent of American adults say they’re very happy, down from 31 percent who said the same in 2018. That year, 23 percent said they’d often or sometimes felt isolated in recent weeks. Now, 50 percent say that.

Read More: General News


Tomika Miller, widow of Rayshard Brooks, speaks at a news conference June 15, 2020, in Atlanta. The Brooks family and their attorneys spoke to the press days after Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by police at a Wendy's restaurant parking lot in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)

Atlanta mayor vows changes in how police officers use force

Atlanta’s mayor is vowing to change police use-of-force policies and require officers to receive continuous training in how to deescalate situations before consequences become fatal. Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced her plans after the police killing of a black man, Rayshard Brooks, outside a fast-food restaurant Friday touched off more large protests in the city. The mayor said she’ll require officers to intervene if they see a colleague using excessive force.

Read More: Atlanta


People march down the street towards the Georgia state capitol to protest against the mistreatment of black people and to press for policy change, June 15, 2020, in Atlanta. The NAACP March to the Capitol coincided with the restart of the Georgia 2020 General Assembly. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Trump, Senate GOP seek police changes as Democrats urge more

President Donald Trump is set to announce executive actions on police procedures and Senate Republicans are preparing a package of policing changes as the GOP rushes to respond to mass demonstrations over the deaths of George Floyd and other black Americans. It’s a sudden shift for the Republican Party, warily watched by Democrats, showing how quickly mass protests over police violence and racial prejudice are transforming national politics.

Read more: Police


A woman sitting on a stoop reading a book in the sun is seen reflected by a closed clothing store's window in the SoHo neighborhood May 7, 2020, in New York. U.S. retail sales likely recovered somewhat in May as the economy increasingly reopened from closures caused by the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, file)

US retail sales up a record 17.7% in a partial rebound

U.S. retail sales jumped by a record 17.7 percent from April to May, with spending partially rebounding after the coronavirus had shut down businesses, flattened the economy and paralyzed consumers during the previous two months. The government’s report Tuesday showed that retail sales have retraced some of the record-setting month-to-month plunges of March (8.3 percent) and April (14.7 percent) as businesses have increasingly reopened.

Read More: Retail sales


An Oscar statue appears outside the Dolby Theatre for the 87th Academy Awards Feb. 21, 2015, in Los Angeles. The Oscars are implementing some big changes, including having a set number of best picture nominees and to-be-determined representation and inclusion standards for eligibility. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP, File)

Academy delays 2021 Oscars ceremony because of coronavirus

For the fourth time in its history, the Oscars are being postponed. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the ABC Television Network said Monday that the 93rd Academy Awards will now be held April 25, 2021, eight weeks later than originally planned because of the pandemic’s effects on the movie industry. The Academy’s Board of Governors also decided to extend the eligibility window beyond the calendar year to Feb. 28, 2021, for feature films.

Read more: Academy Awards

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