5 international stories of the week

A waiter walks to serve customers at a restaurant, June 15, 2020, in Paris. Paris is rediscovering itself, as its cafes and restaurants reopen for the first time since the fast-spreading virus forced them to close their doors March 14. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A waiter walks to serve customers at a restaurant, June 15, 2020, in Paris. Paris is rediscovering itself, as its cafes and restaurants reopen for the first time since the fast-spreading virus forced them to close their doors March 14. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Countries reopening as a possible resurgence of the virus is detected in China, France testing stun guns for wider use by the police, an American sentenced for spying in Russia, the Israeli prime minister’s corruption trial and a Philippine journalist being convicted for libel make up this week’s five international stories.


A resident wearing a face mask to curb the spread of the coronavirus browses meat products at a supermarket June 15, 2020, in Beijing. China's capital was bracing Monday for a resurgence of the coronavirus after more than 100 new cases were reported in recent days in a city that hadn't seen a case of local transmission in more than a month. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

As Europe reopens, Beijing outbreak shows need for vigilance 

European countries reopened borders Monday after a three-month coronavirus shutdown and reopening continued in Mexico and Brazil just when the need for constant vigilance came into sharp focus as China, where COVID-19 first emerged last year, rushed to contain an outbreak in the capital of Beijing. The head of the World Health Organization said more than 100,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus have been reported globally each day in the last two weeks.

Read more: Virus Outbreak


Cherry Hill Township Police Officer Patrick Higgins takes part in a stun gun training session Sept. 25, 2012, at the Gloucester Township, N.J., Police Training Facility. After France banned police chokeholds, the government responded to growing officer discontent by announcing it would test stun guns for wider use. (Chris LaChall/Camden Courier-Post via AP, File)

France swaps chokehold for stun guns after police protests

Less than a week after France banned police chokeholds, the government responded to growing officer discontent by announcing it would test stun guns for wider use, adding to European law enforcement agencies that have recently adopted the weapons that many equate with excess police violence. Tasers, or other stun guns, are increasingly the weapon of choice for European law enforcement as they have been for years in the United States.

Read more: Law enforcement agencies


Paul Whelan, a former U.S. marine who was arrested for alleged spying, listens to the verdict in a courtroom at the Moscow City Court June 15, 2020, in Moscow, Russia. The court convicted Paul Whelan on charges of espionage and sentenced him to 16 years in maximum security prison colony. (Sofia Sandurskaya, Moscow News Agency photo via AP)

American convicted of spying in Russia, gets 16 years

A Russian court convicted an American corporate security executive Monday of espionage and sentenced him to 16 years in prison after a closed trial that the U.S. denounced as a “mockery of justice,” and it angrily said his treatment in jail was “appalling.” Paul Whelan, a former Marine from Novi, Michigan, has insisted he was innocent, saying he was set up when he was arrested in Moscow in December 2018 while he was visiting Russia to attend a friend’s wedding.

Read more: Paul Whelan


Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, accompanied by members of his Likud Party in masks, delivers a statement before entering the district court May 24, 2020, in Jerusalem. Netanyahu is on trial for accepting gifts from wealthy friends. (AP Photo/Yonatan Sindel/Pool Photo via AP, File)

Netanyahu turns to rich friend to fund corruption trial fees

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is on trial for accepting gifts from wealthy friends, but that has not stopped him from seeking another gift from a wealthy friend to pay for his multimillion-dollar legal defense. Netanyahu has asked an Israeli oversight committee to allow a $2.9 million donation from Spencer Partrich, a Michigan-based real estate magnate. The arrangement opens a window into the very ties that plunged him into legal trouble.

Read more: Benjamin Netanyahu


Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa gestures during a press conference June 15, 2020, in Manila, Philippines. Ressa, an award-winning journalist critical of the Philippine president, her online news site Rappler Inc. and Santos were convicted of libel and sentenced to jail in a decision called a major blow to press freedom in an Asian bastion of democracy. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Philippine journalist convicted of libel, given 6-year term

An award-winning journalist critical of the Philippine president was convicted of libel and sentenced to jail Monday in a decision called a major blow to press freedom in the Philippines. The Manila court found Maria Ressa of the online news site Rappler Inc. and former reporter Reynaldo Santos Jr. guilty of libeling a wealthy businessman. A 2012 Rappler story cited an intelligence report linking him to a murder, drug dealing, human trafficking and smuggling.

Read more: Philippines

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