5 international stories of the week

<p>Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers surround a suspect at a gas station in Enfield, Nova Scotia on Sunday April 19, 2020. Canadian police say multiple people are dead plus the suspect after a shooting rampage across the province of Nova Scotia. <strong>(Tim Krochak/The Canadian Press via AP)</strong></p>

Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers surround a suspect at a gas station in Enfield, Nova Scotia on Sunday April 19, 2020. Canadian police say multiple people are dead plus the suspect after a shooting rampage across the province of Nova Scotia. (Tim Krochak/The Canadian Press via AP)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Canada’s deadliest mass shooting, child sex abuse by religious clerics in Pakistan, protests against Israel’s prime minister, Google and Facebook to pay for news content in Australia and North Korea’s questionable zero virus claim make up this week’s five international stories.


Workers with the medical examiner's office remove a body from a gas station April 19, 2020, in Enfield, Nova Scotia. Sixteen people were killed in the deadliest shooting in Canada in 30 years. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press via AP)

16 killed in shooting rampage, deadliest in Canadian history

A gunman disguised as a police officer shot people in their homes and set fires in a rampage across the Canadian province of Nova Scotia that killed 16 people, the deadliest such attack in the country’s history. A police officer was among those killed. Officials said Sunday the suspected shooter was also dead. The assault began late Saturday, and authorities believe the shooter may have targeted his first victims but then began attacking randomly.

Read more: Shootings


Pakistani children take part in rally against child abuse Jan. 31, 2020, in Islamabad, Pakistan. The Associated Press collected dozens of police reports across Pakistan that allege sexual harassment, rape and physical abuse by Islamic clerics teaching in madrassas or religious schools in Pakistan. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

Child sex abuse in Pakistan’s religious schools is endemic

An AP investigation found dozens of police reports alleging sexual harassment, rape and physical abuse by Islamic clerics teaching in madrassas throughout Pakistan, where many of the country’s poorest study. There is no central body of clerics that governs more than 22,000 registered madrassas and no central authority that can investigate or respond to allegations of abuse by clerics, unlike the Catholic Church’s clear hierarchy topped by the Vatican.

Read more: Sexual abuse by clergy


A woman takes part in a protest against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, seen on the poster, April 19, 2020, in Tel Aviv, Israel. The demonstrators accused Netanyahu of using the coronavirus crisis as cover to undermine the country's democratic institutions. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Israelis accuse Netanyahu of endangering democracy

More than 2,000 Israelis took to the streets of Tel Aviv on Sunday, demonstrating against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s attempts to form an “emergency” government with his chief rival and accusing him of using the coronavirus crisis to escape prosecution on corruption charges. Demonstrators wore face masks, largely followed social-distancing rules and some held black flags, as speakers criticized Netanyahu’s possible partnership with rival Benny Gantz.

Read more: Israel


Australia's Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, right, with Minister for Communications Paul Fletcher speaks April 20, 2020, in Canberra. Global digital platforms Google and Facebook will be forced to pay for news content in Australia. (Mick Tsikas/AAP Image via AP)

Australia to make Google and Facebook pay for news content

Global digital platforms Google and Facebook will be forced to pay for news content in Australia, the government said Monday, as the coronavirus pandemic causes a collapse in advertising revenue. Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission would release in late July draft rules for the platforms to pay fair compensation for the journalistic content siphoned from news media.

Read more: Australia


In this photo provided by the North Korean government, its leader Kim Jong Un inspects the military drill of units of the Korean People's Army, Feb. 28, 2020, with soldiers shown wearing face masks. North Korea says it has zero coronavirus infections, but experts doubt it. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP, File)

North Korean defectors, experts question zero virus claim

Experts say North Korea’s reluctance to admit major outbreaks of disease, wrecked medical infrastructure and extreme sensitivity to any potential threat to Kim Jong Un’s rule means Pyongyang is likely handling the current coronavirus pandemic in the same manner. This has led to widespread skepticism over its claim to have zero infections. Outsiders suspect COVID-19 has already spread to North Korea because it shares a border with China.

Read more: North Korea

Comments

More from The Daily







This Week's Digital Issue