Saudi Student Club celebrates Islamic Holiday

<p>The Saudi Student Club held Eid al-Adha celebration on Monday at Cornerstone Center for the Arts that featured prayers, a magician, games and food. <em>Patrick Calvert // DN&nbsp;</em></p>

The Saudi Student Club held Eid al-Adha celebration on Monday at Cornerstone Center for the Arts that featured prayers, a magician, games and food. Patrick Calvert // DN 

The Saudi Student Club held an Eid al-Adha celebration Sept.12 at Cornerstone Center for the Arts that featured prayers, a magician, games and food.

Muslims from all across the globe are celebrating the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Adha, which is the second Eid celebration of the year, with the first one being Eid al-Fitr. The holiday is also known as the Festival of the Sacrifice, and it commemorates Ibrahim’s sacrifice of his only son.

Yasser Alshaalan, a senior human resource major and organizer of the event, was chosen to be the president for Ball State’s chapter of the Saudi Student Club by the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission, which encourages Saudi students to share culture and tradition in America.

Alshaalan’s favorite part about Eid is seeing all of his friends from Saudi Arabia, as well as people from other backgrounds that want to learn more about other cultures.

“It’s kind of like a party,” Alshaalan said. “We can invite our friends who are Chinese, Americans or anyone from anywhere in the world and share our [culture].”

Alshaalan also used the event to meet all the new Saudi students who just started going to school at Ball State.

Anas Almassrahy, a junior urban planning major, lead the two prayers of the evening and thanked Ball State for supporting the Saudi student Club.

“I’m so thankful to Ball State for being very nice and very supportive," Almassrahy said.

He also said he was happy to see others at the event who wanted to learn more about other cultures, calling them “open-minded.”

Abdullah Alghamdi, a computer science graduate student, came to the celebration to spend time with his friends. The graduate student said this year was a great Eid because his schedule was a lot less busy.

“It’s a huge moment to play, sing and think with the Saudi guys,” Alghamdi said.

Abdulrahman Alghamdi, a graduate student who studies statistics, thought the event reminded him of back home in Saudi Arabia.

“It’s nice to have a little taste of back home here in America,” Abdulrahman said.

He also enjoyed the food but not as much as back home.

“Thanks to the guys; they did their best ,and it’s pretty nice," Abdulrahman said.

Abdulrahman also had a word for Americans who are curious about Saudi culture or Islam.

“Happy Eid to all of you and hopefully we will see you come over here and celebrate with us in the future," he said.

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