Focus on greater good, not wrongs

My column last week focused on some challenges facing our country that would require a united effort to overcome. After reading the "Democrat Dish" last Tuesday, I realized that uniting for these challenges will be all but impossible. My column this week will be a response to the unjust and disturbing remarks I read in the Democratic column last week.

"Unfair" and "present of circumstance" were words used to describe President Bush's support since the tragedy on Sept. 11. I realize that the columns written here reflect only each individual's thoughts on a certain subject, but those words are completely unfounded. Ladies and Gentlemen, what's unfair is the fact that over 5,000 people lost their life. What's unfair is that our own freedom was used against us. I ask you, is that a present of circumstance?

Bush now has the burden of keeping together a coalition to fight a war unlike one our world has ever seen before. Our troops are fighting a war for our freedom in a monumental task to wipe out terrorism. Despite this, there are those who focus on Democrats not getting enough attention.

There was also an excerpt about conservatives blaming Clinton. That is all it said, "don't blame Clinton." What are we blaming him for? I will assume that this comment is a reference to the economy's lack of luster right now, and if so, I issue a similar comment; don't blame President Bush for that. Placing blame isn't nearly as important as finding ways to combat the sagging economy. Democrats and Republicans seem to be doing a pretty good job cooperating in this matter. Anyone can point fingers, but it is only a few that can provide solutions.

In item 3 of the "Democrat Dish," President Bush is asked to apologize. Now, here is where I get really upset. Every comment made about Bush simply highlights the changes that he has gone through since Sept. 11. Like him or not, Bush has grown leaps and bounds to deal with the "new world" created when the first plane smashed into the World Trade Center. His policies have changed some to address new, unthinkable issues, but at his core values he is still the man the electorate voted for. Again, I pose a question. In saying that Bush should apologize, are you asking him to apologize for being the leader we need him to be?

Finally, there is the issue of bipartisanship. It is only human to disagree from time to time. Since Sept. 11 our politicians have united in ways I thought not possible. For the most part things remain that way, especially on issues that deal with the war on terrorism. Obviously there are always going to be differing opinions on how the country should deal with certain issues, and unity can only go so far. I will agree that compromising is an art that both parties should practice on occasion.

In a time like this I get upset when anyone, Democrat or Republican, solely focus on their personal agendas and demand that they have the center spotlight. As a country we are stepping up to the plate. We are making the big decisions and stomaching the blows that sometimes come from mistakes. Let's not revert to an oblivious society only aware of what we want and not the greater good of the whole country.


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