'Shrek the Musical' to open this weekend

<p>Ball State's Department of Theatre and Dance will show&nbsp;"Shrek the Musical" on March 31 at&nbsp;the University Theatre. The musical, co-directed by&nbsp;Bill Jenkins, chairman of the Department of Theatre and Dance, and&nbsp;Broadway actress Sutton Foster, is based on the DreamWorks Animation film about an ogre on a quest to rescue a princess from her tower.&nbsp;<em>Kip Shawger // Photo Provided</em></p>

Ball State's Department of Theatre and Dance will show "Shrek the Musical" on March 31 at the University Theatre. The musical, co-directed by Bill Jenkins, chairman of the Department of Theatre and Dance, and Broadway actress Sutton Foster, is based on the DreamWorks Animation film about an ogre on a quest to rescue a princess from her tower. Kip Shawger // Photo Provided

What: “Shrek the Musical”

Where: University Theatre

When: 7:30 p.m. today, Saturday, Sunday and April 4-9; 2:30 p.m. Sunday and April 8, 9

Cost: $18 for the general public, $15 for students, staff, faculty and senior citizens, $10 for children 12 and under.

Tickets can be purchased by calling the box office at 765-285-8749 or online.

Ball State’s Department of Theatre and Dance will take on a childhood favorite and bring it to the University Theatre stage this weekend.

“Shrek the Musical” will open at 7:30 p.m. today. 

The musical is based on the DreamWorks Animation film, following the ogre Shrek as he goes on a quest for Lord Farquaad in exchange for his swamp. With his “noble steed” Donkey, he rescues Princess Fiona from her tower.

On the way back to the Kingdom of Duloc, the trio bonds and learns, among other things, you can’t judge a book by its cover.

New elements are added to the existing plot, like songs to develop Fiona and Shrek’s relationship.

Both Fiona and Farquaad also have more backstory elements in the show, like details about Fiona’s childhood and Farquaad’s father.

Conor Korbisch is a junior musical theater major and plays Farquaad. He said it’s been fun to portray multiple sides of his character.

“The most fun is when things are going his way because he’s so unbelievably happy,” Korbisch said. “He’s a bad guy, but he’s the hero in his own story and Shrek becomes the bad guy.”

Korbisch said it was originally difficult to feel like part of the team because the play is about acceptance, but his character is the one exiling everyone.

“I just had to realize that Farquaad wants to be accepted too, he’s just a jerk about it,” he said.

Broadway actress Sutton Foster co-directed the production with Bill Jenkins, chairman of the Department of Theatre and Dance.

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