Milling it Over: Leave fanny packs in the past

<p>DN PHOTO SAMANTHA BRAMMER</p>

DN PHOTO SAMANTHA BRAMMER

Miller Kern is a sophomore journalism major and writes "Milling it Over" for the Daily News. Her views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Miller at mskern@bsu.edu.

Once a staple of the 1980s, the fanny pack has made its way through the fashion industry. Fanny packs went out of style with the turn of the Millennium. In recent years, however, the packs have been sneaking their way back into style, hiding behind names like “belt bag” or “waist pack.”

Fanny packs received their name from their original location on the human body. During their first reign of popularity, fanny packs were worn on the back of the waist. With their comeback, they’ve migrated to the front and side of the waist.

Companies like Michael Kors and Gucci hopped on the bandwagon and started creating “designer” fanny packs. Styles of packs are making a transition from the typical brightly colored nylon to neutral leather and canvas.

Today, fanny packs are typically found around the waists of sorority girls and music festival attendees. Sorority members sport packs customized with their Greek letters, while concert-goers' fanny packs usually display a psychedelic pattern.

Traveling is another activity that welcomes fanny packs. The hands-free and strapless features of the packs allow more mobility than a purse or backpack, which makes life on the go easier.

Though fanny packs seem to offer multiple beneficial functions, the sheer “90s mom on vacation” look wipes out any possible good traits of the pack.

Millennials are known for bringing styles back from the grave (i.e. platform shoes, oversized sweaters, overalls etc.). Fanny packs are one trend that should stay buried.

Like many things Millennials do, fanny packs seem to have come back in style out of irony before slowly easing their way into people’s actual fashion tastes. Unfortunately, they appear to be here to stay as more big brand names are pilfering “belt bags” into their lineups.

Miller Kern

Fanny packs are unstylish both on their own and on a person. The positioning on the body is flattering on virtually nobody. Unless your desired look is seatbelt with a pouch, stray away from fanny packs.

Don’t sacrifice style for functionality. A small crossbody bag can easily take the place of a fanny pack while maintaining a reputation of good taste.

The fanny pack is one vintage item that straight up does not work. As Regina George would say, “Stop trying to make fetch happen.” 

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