BINGE WATCHER: Video Games Live succeeds with nostalgia, misses out on 'Halo'

Video Games Live, created Tommy Tallarico, performed on March 19 at John R. Emens with the Muncie Symphony Orchestra and choir as the ensemble. The program featured a costume contest, "Guitar Hero" contest, a Facebook contest and Tallarico concluded the show with a photo of the crowd. DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY
Video Games Live, created Tommy Tallarico, performed on March 19 at John R. Emens with the Muncie Symphony Orchestra and choir as the ensemble. The program featured a costume contest, "Guitar Hero" contest, a Facebook contest and Tallarico concluded the show with a photo of the crowd. DN PHOTO BREANNA DAUGHERTY

Matt McKinney is a senior journalism news major and writes ‘Binge Watcher’ for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily reflect those of the newspaper. Write to Matt at mdmckinney@bsu.edu.

Matt McKinney

Late in the performance of Video Games Live, many people, myself included, were screaming at host Tommy Tallarico and the Muncie Symphony Orchestra “'Halo!'”

We wanted to hear the iconic theme song to one of the most popular game series of all time.

Tallarico steps into the microphone in front of him and says this last song is one of their most requested songs to play…

“'Chrono Trigger' and 'Chrono Cross!'”

Oh.

OK.

Look, Video Games Live was a lot of fun. I enjoyed the nostalgia of hearing the soundtrack to “Castlevania” for the first time in years, as well as remembering how hard it was to beat some of the enemies in “Shadow of the Colossus” while the theme played.

But I’ll be honest – I went for “Halo.” And it was clear a lot of others did too.

I’m sure Video Games Live has a valid reason why it wasn’t played, perhaps something with the rights to the songs. But it’s still on its website under “Game franchises include.” It’s third on that list.

Also part of the show was Blizzard Audio Director and Composer Russell Brower. He conducted the orchestra, which was outstanding.

When he introduced the “World of Warcraft” music, it was easy to see the passion he had for the music. After all, he did create it.

Also present for the performance was metal musician Viking Jesus. Yes, that was his actual name. While a bit distracting at times, he gave the show a little energy when he was onstage.

Other than Viking Jesus, Video Games Live had many distractions to entertain the crowd in between the actual video game music, one of which was a guy playing “Guitar Hero” for a gift certificate to Game X Change. (He may not have been actually playing. It was hard to tell.)

From a less musical aspect, I enjoyed the fact that Video Games Live was lax about its rules about taking pictures and videos. It was refreshing to be able to record sections of the show I liked, as well as see families taking photos as a keepsake.

The climax of the performance was, without a doubt, “One Winged Angel” from “Final Fantasy VII.” When Tallarico announced it, the crowd was into it. It was a great moment.

Some of the other songs on the setlist were songs from “Mass Effect,” “League of Legends,” “The Legend of Zelda,” “Mega Man,” “Metal Gear Solid” and “Kingdom Hearts.”

I’ll remember a lot of the songs I heard from the performance for many years to come. But I’ll also remember the disappointment I felt when it ended without hearing the “Dun dun dun duuuuuu… ”

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