Caitlen Ramey is a freshman journalism major and writes "Cait's Corner" for the Daily News. Her views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Caitlen at cnramey@bsu.edu.

Caitlen Ramey

There has been this stereotype placed upon me that because I am a Republican, that I hate women. That my political views define me as an individual. I understand that mindset and where someone would be coming from based on the misogynist acts of Donald Trump and others in the political spotlight. But I still stand for my beliefs and find the constant protesting against the 45th president extremely tiresome, even if the man’s “tan” looks worse than mine at my junior prom. 

I am not racist, sexist, misogynistic or homophobic; I am for free market, small government, believe that college is a privilege and shouldn’t be free. I strongly believe in the Second Amendment, I trust it is the best form of protection. I am a Republican.

I am not a disgrace to women because of my perspective. People look at me funny when I tell them that I would consider myself a feminist. 

Nowadays the idea of feminism is taken to the extremes, the movement was hijacked and distorted to mean something completely different than it is.

Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines feminism as, “the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities.” This is the definition that has been lost in the modern-day feminist movement and in most recent news headlines, the Women’s March. 

I am a woman. I can make my own choices. I can vote. I can speak my voice and be heard. I can work if I want; I came to Ball State to seek an education and earn a bachelor’s degree. I take responsibility for my actions. I am thankful for the feminists that came before me that fought for my right to vote and have a career, and I am thankful for the continuous fight against sexism.

Being a feminist means that women support other women. Being an advocate for rights and equality means that you encourage others, it is believing that a girl can be anything she wants to be; you can be a stay-at-home mom or a CEO because there’s nothing wrong with either.

I see flaws in finding Kim Kardashian being prioritized as a role model over women such as Ivanka Trump or Oprah; these ideals do not dismiss the power of men, it isn’t about being “better” or “best,” it is making sure that women are respected for their values just as much as the men are.

Men and women were not created to be equal; we are biologically, emotionally and spiritually different. I believe that chivalry isn’t dead, I accept when the door is being held for me and when someone offers to pay, but I will return the favor. 

God never said that women couldn’t be strong, opinionated, intelligent and hardworking. Instead, he tells us that we should use our gifts and differences in His kingdom. We are all here to serve a different purpose because we were all blessed with different gifts. It does not mean that we should aspire to be any less of what we were created to do.

So here I am, as a young Christian, conservative, feminist, to tell you that the negative connotations of the words above, aren’t what you perceive. I believe in advocating for equal treatment and that I am just as capable, but I decided this on my own. I do not play the victim card or expect life to be handed to me, I must prove myself. 

I was created to be strong and independent with what the Lord has intended for me locked in my heart, but I will never submit myself under the belief that I am under appreciated or inferior.

This is who I am.