A peaceful protestor holds a sign in support of the notion to remain educated on issues of racial injustice. As student journalists at The Daily News, we take our responsibility to report informative and educational stories on topics of relevance in our society today. Unsplash, Photo Courtesy

OUR VIEW: More than a Month

More than a century ago, Carter G. Woodson traveled from his home in Washington, D.C. to Chicago, where he celebrated the 50th anniversary of emancipation with thousands of other Black Americans at Chicago Coliseum. The exhibits inside commemorated Black achievements since the abolition of slavery, and what Woodson saw inspired him to highlight and memorialize Black heritage while educating others through developing curriculum, journals and organizations dedicated to Black History.



Track and field head coach Adrian Wheatley poses for a photo on Feb. 14 at the BSU Field Sports Building. Amber Pietz, DN
BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Chasing standards: The balance of winning while embracing the process has been a key ingredient for Adrian Wheatley’s success

Moving forward, Adrian said he wants to emphasize the importance of a team-first mentality and hopes to create an atmosphere where the Cardinals respect one another and become a part of something bigger than themselves. Adrian believes there is a role for everybody in the program and wants his athletes to prosper in three phases.  



Erica Robinson Moody laughs while doing her son Brooklyn's hair Jan. 27. Erica's mission statement for her classes is "bridging the cultural gaps in the beauty community," and she is very focused on cultural hair education. Maya Wilkins, DN
BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Muncie Education in Biracial Hair class aims to change the beauty industry

In a room attached to the kitchen of Erica Robinson Moody’s home sits two salon chairs. A cabinet is filled with different colored hair dyes, an apron hangs on a hook near a large mirror and products stand in single-file lines on the counters.  Her son, Brooklyn Moody, sits in a salon chair where his mom said he often falls asleep, while she takes a comb, twirls it tightly on a small section of his hair and creates a tight, springy curl an inch or two in length. Dozens of these curls lie across his head. Brooklyn’s hairstyle takes 45 minutes to style this way, and the style only stays for about a week —  a reality for biracial hair.







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