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Photos from the Ball State Walkout to end gun violence

This morning at 9:45 a.m., members of the Muncie community gathered on Ball State’s University Green to remember and honor the lives of the 17 people killed in Parkland Florida one month ago today. Participants came clad in orange, carrying signs and ready to make their voices heard.  


What the Ball State Walkout means to the women involved

For many planning to participate in tomorrow’s protest honoring the lives of the 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, it will be a demonstration of political outrage, but for others gun violence is more personal. We got to sit down with two important women who are organizing the demonstration and hear about their reasons for speaking out. 



Ball State students interview David Letterman to tell Ball State’s centennial story

The students reached out to prominent BSU alumnus, David Letterman, for the opportunity to interview him. “We got in contact with him through the President’s office,” Director John Osterhoudt told Byte reporters, “and then we heard back literally like two weeks ago and he was like, ‘Yeah, come to New York.’” The students drove to Letterman’s publicist’s office in Manhattan to conduct the interview. 



Our sneak peek of Ball State’s production of ‘Pericles’

Ball State students are performing one of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays, Pericles: Prince of Tyre, in Strother Studio Theatre. Under the direction of Ball State theatre professor Karen Kessler, dozens of students have worked to put on an impressive production. The show stars Jacob Barnes, an acting major in his senior year, playing the eponymous ancient prince.  


Hoosier tech CEO warns of Indiana’s future as a tech-friendly city in an open letter to the state

Josh Driver, CEO of tech start-up Selfless.ly and the man behind Open for Service, released “an open letter to the state of Indiana,” in response to the state’s failure to pass a hate crime bill in the form of Senate Bill 418. Indiana remains one of five states without such a bill, which increases the penalties for crimes influenced by the victim’s race, ethnicity, religion, gender or sexual orientation.


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