Five national news stories of the week

<p>California and New York City government workers are required to get vaccinated. If workers are not vaccinated, then they will have to face weekly tests. <strong>Unsplash, Photo Courtesy</strong></p>

California and New York City government workers are required to get vaccinated. If workers are not vaccinated, then they will have to face weekly tests. Unsplash, Photo Courtesy

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from around the world. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Last victim ID'd in Florida condo building collapse, Jacoby wins swimming gold for the US, California and New York City require government workers to get the coronavirus vaccine, Biden says US combat mission in Iraq to conclude by year end and warming rivers in US West are killing fish and imperiling the industry makes up this week's five national stories.

Last victim ID'd in Florida condo building collapse

The final victim of the condo building collapse in Florida has been identified, a relative said Monday, more than a month after the middle-of-the-night catastrophe that ultimately claimed 98 lives and became the largest non-hurricane related emergency response in state history. Estelle Hedaya, an outgoing 54-year-old with a love of travel, was the last to be identified, ending what her relatives described as a torturous four-week wait. A funeral was scheduled for Tuesday. It comes just days after rescuers officially concluded the painstaking and emotionally heavy task of removing layers of dangerous debris and pulling out dozens of bodies.

Jacoby wins swimming gold for the US

Alaska has an Olympic swimming champion. Seventeen-year-old high schooler Lydia Jacoby gave the United States a victory in the women’s 100-meter breaststroke, knocking off teammate and defending Olympic champion Lilly King. Jacoby was the first swimmer from the state ever to make the U.S. Olympic swimming team. Now, she’s heading back to Anchorage with a gold medal, rallying to win in 1 minute, 4.95 seconds. South Africa’s Tatjana Schoenmaker claimed the silver in 1:05.22, while King gave the Americans another medal by taking the bronze in 1:05.54.

California, NYC to workers: Get vaccine or face weekly tests

California and New York City announced Monday that they would require all government employees to get the coronavirus vaccine or face weekly COVID-19 testing, and the Department of Veterans Affairs became the first major federal agency to require health care workers to receive the shot. Meanwhile, in a possible sign that increasingly dire health warnings are getting through to more Americans, vaccination rates began to creep up again, offering hope that the nation could yet break free of the coronavirus if people who have been reluctant to receive the shot are finally inoculated.

Biden says US combat mission in Iraq to conclude by year end

President Joe Biden said Monday the U.S. combat mission in Iraq will conclude by the end of the year, an announcement that reflects the reality on the ground more than a major shift in U.S. policy. Even before Biden took office, the main U.S. focus has been assisting Iraqi forces, not fighting on their behalf. And Biden did not say if he planned to reduce the number of troops in Iraq, now about 2,500. The announcement comes on the heels of Biden’s decision to withdraw fully from Afghanistan nearly 20 years after the U.S. launched that war in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Warming rivers in US West killing fish, imperiling industry

Baby salmon are dying by the thousands in one California river, and an entire run of endangered salmon could be wiped out in another. Fishermen who make their living off adult salmon, once they enter the Pacific Ocean, are sounding the alarm as blistering heat waves and extended drought in the U.S. West raise water temperatures and imperil fish from Idaho to California. Hundreds of thousands of young salmon are dying in Northern California’s Klamath River as low water levels brought about by drought allow a parasite to thrive, devastating a Native American tribe whose diet and traditions are tied to the fish.

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