5 national stories of the week

Sarah Cook looks at the remnants of houses and mobile homes April 13, 2020, in this Bassfield, Miss., neighborhood. Harper Town was one of many neighborhoods in Mississippi swept by a series of tornadoes, Sunday afternoon and evening. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Sarah Cook looks at the remnants of houses and mobile homes April 13, 2020, in this Bassfield, Miss., neighborhood. Harper Town was one of many neighborhoods in Mississippi swept by a series of tornadoes, Sunday afternoon and evening. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Editor’s Note: This listicle is part of a weekly series by The Ball State Daily News summarizing five stories from across the United States. All summaries are based on stories published by The Associated Press.

Storms in the Southeast, detained immigrants seeking protection during the pandemic, the president’s pick losing the Wisconsin court race, cities and counties that could be left out from the $2.2 trillion stimulus package and the president’s new panel for reopening the economy make up this week’s five national stories.


Randy Shoemaker embraces his son after the family survived a deadly tornado April 13, 2020, in Chatsworth, Ga. Shoemaker and his family survived by covering themselves with mattresses in the bathroom of their mobile home. (Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

Storms tear through south amid pandemic; more than 30 dead

Storms that killed more than 30 people in the Southeast, piling fresh misery atop a pandemic, spread across the eastern United States on Monday, leaving more than 1 million homes and businesses without power amid floods and mudslides. With a handful of tornadoes already confirmed in the South and storms still raging up the Eastern Seaboard, forecasters fanned out to determine how much of the widespread damage was caused by twisters.

Read more: Tornadoes


This 2018 file photo shows a sign that reads "Families Belong Together" on a fence outside the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash. Immigrant rights groups want U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to release detainees at its Washington state jail who are at high risk from the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Detained immigrants plead for masks, protection from virus

While U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has started to lower the number of detainees to reduce the risk of people getting sick, those held in immigration jails and their advocates say there’s not enough protective gear, cleaning supplies or space to allow for social distancing. These detainees and their advocates fear the number of coronavirus cases will sharply rise in the coming weeks as it has in jails and prisons nationwide.

Read more: Immigration


Election officials count ballots as City of Milwaukee Election Commission workers were processing absentee ballots April 13, 2020, in Milwaukee.(Mike DeSisti/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP)

Voters reject Trump’s pick in chaotic Wisconsin court race

A liberal challenger ousted a conservative Wisconsin Supreme Court justice endorsed by President Donald Trump, overcoming a successful push by Republicans to forge ahead with last week’s election even as numerous other states postponed theirs due to the pandemic. Joe Biden also emerged victorious, as expected, in the state’s Democratic presidential primary after Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders dropped out one day after Wisconsin held in-person voting.

Read more: Election 2020


A closed sign hangs in the window of a shop March 25, 2020, in Portsmouth, N.H. Hundreds of cities and counties grappling with the economic fallout caused by the pandemic might receive little, if any, of the emergency funding allotted in the $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

Many cities, counties fear losing out on stimulus funding

The $2.2 trillion federal stimulus package could fail to deliver badly needed financial aid to thousands of smaller cities and counties where a majority of Americans live, according to documents and interviews with local officials. The coronavirus outbreak has blown holes in the budgets of communities as the costs of battling the outbreak skyrocket and critical sources of revenue like sales and income taxes plummet.

Read more: Local governments


White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow speaks during a television interview at the White House, April 10, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

New Trump panel to explore path to reopening US economy

Every day, a team of public health officials turns up in the White House briefing room to lay out the measures being taken to contain the coronavirus pandemic. A different team, expected to be formally announced as early as Tuesday, has begun meeting behind closed doors in the West Wing to tackle another matter paramount to President Donald Trump: how to begin reopening the American economy. The council is not expected to include health officials.

Read more: Donald Trump

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